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PikesPeakCourier.net

T E L L E R C O U N T Y, C O L O R A D OA publication of

May 13, 2015VOLUME 54 | ISSUE 19 | 7 5 ¢

POSTA

L AD

DRESS

PIKES PEAK COURIER(USPS 654-460)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24Woodland Park, CO 80863

PHONE: 719-687-3006

A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO and additional mailing o� ces.

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CDOT, PPACG, WP talk about sharing the road Moving vehicles, managing pavement, creating nonmotorized-use plans By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

Much of the May 7 Woodland Park City Council meeting centered on highways, streets and trails.

Colorado Department of TransportationKaren Rowe, region 2 director for the

Colorado Department of Transportation, gave a presentation on new protocols for U.S. 24 closures in Ute Pass. Unlike last year when the highway was closed as a precau-tion based on weather projections, this year there will be team of three people assessing the highway when inclement weather be-gins. They will be looking mostly for dan-gerous debris fl ows especially in the area between Cascade and Chipita Park/Green Mountain Falls.

If debris fl ows are spotted, these three

will be able to close a series of gates to keep traffi c out between Green Mountain Falls and the Cave of the Winds exit in Manitou Springs. Media and law enforcement will be notifi ed and information will be posted on electronic message boards. Where possible, Rowe said detours could be put in place to relieve traffi c congestion.

Councilmember Bob Carlsen asked her about lowering speed limits in downtown Woodland Park to 25 mph and raising them to 60 mph between the city and Cascade Rowe said the speed limit through town must remain at its current 30 mph but that the state could possibly conduct a speed survey east of town to determine if raising the speed limit is feasible.

State transportation is also working with the city to adjust traffi c signals to make in-tersections safer and local law enforcement and the Colorado State Patrol are working together on enhanced surveillance at sig-nals to deter red-light running.

Pikes Peak Area Council of GovernmentsPikes Peak Area Council of Govern-

ments’ Transportation Director Craig

Casper and Transportation Planner Emily Lindsey reported on the organization’s Re-gional Nonmotorized Transportation Sys-tem Plan, which will cover El Paso County out to Calhan and Teller County up to Di-vide and stretch out to 2040.

Lindsey said the planning goal is to de-velop infrastructure for biking, walking and other nonmotorized uses that are safe, con-nected, easy to use, and well-maintained. Creating the draft plan took two years by a taskforce with 45 participants. Some of the highlights of the plan included creating better east-west connectivity throughout the region, creating a way-fi nding signage system and fi nish connecting local trails to both the American Discovery Trail and the Colorado Front Range Trail.

There will be a Ute Pass Trail public meeting from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on May 20 at the Centennial Building on S. Cascade in Colorado Springs.

Casper said nonmotorized trail and open space usage has a big economic impact on the Pikes Peak Region. Citing just one ex-ample, he said bicycling alone pumps more than $27 million directly into the economy.

This fi gure doesn’t include additional indi-rect economic impact.

He encouraged Woodland Park and Tell-er County residents to visit www.walkbike-connect.org to comment on the draft plan and make suggestions.

Woodland Park Public WorksCouncil approved several contracts for

city street improvements and construction projects starting this summer:

Golden Triangle Construction Inc. will receive about $1.65 million to renovate the city’s Fleet Maintenance Facility. This work would have been funding by a certifi cate of participation but City Manager David But-tery said that with a generous grant from the Colorado Department of Local Affairs and some rearranging of the budget, the city will be able to pay cash for the work.

Complete Koncrete Inc. was awarded $28,175 for assorted concrete repairs in the city.

SNS Enterprises LLC was awarded $26,824 for street stripping. Other contracts for street repair work were awarded in April.

Senators receive wild� re support recommendations Report centers on collaborative decision-making, investing in preparedness By Rob Carrigan [emailprotected]

Colorado U.S. Sens. Michael Ben-net and Cory Gardner received rec-ommendations from a report Ben-net commissioned over a year ago. The report, presented at a Fire and Forestry Summit Saturday in Colo-rado Springs, suggests steps the fed-eral government can take to better support Colorado’s wildfi re mitiga-tion efforts.

The senators were presented with those recommendations by more than 40 fi re and forestry experts from across the state who worked to com-pile the report. El Paso County Com-missioner Sallie Clark, representa-tives from the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, Colo-rado State University, the Colorado Water Congress, County Commis-sioners from across the Front Range and West Slope, and other members of the forestry, conservation, and wildfi re prevention community all contributed to the development of fi ndings.

Following the summit Bennet

toured the Navigators Glen Eyrie property to highlight the post-fi re fl ood mitigation efforts in El Paso County. The Navigators have spent more than $7 million on such efforts.

“Colorado has a vast and deep knowledge of forest health and fi re mitigation. It’s based on real-world experience and the federal govern-

ment should tap into it,” Bennet said. “Our offi ce commissioned this report to hear fi rsthand from the ex-perts on the ground about what the federal government can do to im-prove the health of our forests and prevent wildfi res. The recommen-dations we received today will help us develop effective, collaborative policy to help deal with the growing threat of wildfi re. We are thankful to everyone who contributed to this important conversation and came out today.”

“Preventing wildfi res when pos-sible and preparing for when they do occur is everyone’s job,” Gardner said. “It’s critical for offi cials from the local level to the federal government to be on the same page, and today’s summit was an important step in ensuring that they are. We must con-

tinue to be diligent in our efforts to prevent these incredibly damaging natural disasters and their equally destructive effects.”

In March 2014, Bennet convened a large group of Colorado leaders in forestry and fi re mitigation to dis-cuss ways the federal government can best work to support collab-orative, on the ground fi re protec-tion and forest health efforts. The group spent a day with Bennet and USDA Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment Robert Bonnie, discussing their real-world experiences working in Colorado forests and communities.

At Bennet’s request, the group then worked together to develop a detailed report on the outcomes from that conversation, with specifi c recommendations for federal policy.

U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet was joined by Sen. Cory Gardner at a Fire and Forestry Summit to receive recommenda-tions from a report Bennet commissioned on steps the federal government can take to better support Colorado’s wild� re mitigation e� orts. Photos by Rob Carrigan

U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, Navigators’ Derek Strickler and El Paso County Com-missioner Sallie Clark tour Glen Eyrie after the Fire and Forestry Summit.

The Navigators have spent nearly $7 million in post-� re � ood mitigation e� orts at Glen Eyrie in El Paso County.

INSIDE THE COURIER

The Courier celebrates 50 years serving the community. Page 15-26

• Focusing on collaborative decision-mak-ing processes that advance conversations between federal decision makers and com-munity leaders to address wild� re preven-tion, forest management, and regulatory processes.

• Increasing education and outreach to homeowners and communities regarding their responsibility to mitigate fuels and property conditions and the actual risk of wild� re.

• Investing in preparedness, collaborative planning, capacity building, and proactive work before wild� res occur.

• Investing federal resources to support community forest health and wild� re pre-vention leadership.

• Encouraging land management agencies to evaluate their current work and develop new methods that focus on e� ectiveness across the landscape.

• Requesting that federal forest planning information be more accessible to local and regional groups engaged in complemen-tary work.

RECOMMENDATIONS INCLUDED

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Mural project in high gear By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

A mural that tells the story of Woodland Park, its history as well as the residents who have given the city its sense of place, “The Story of Us” is a project of the Woodland Park Arts Alliance.

A draft of the mural in pencil is on dis-play this month in the Eichman Gallery at Park State Bank & Trust. “We start with the Ute Indians,” said Lois Sprague, who will start painting the mural next month on the east wall of the Ute Pass Cultural Center. “I spent a weekend in Montrose talking to Ronald McCook, the Ute historian with the Smithsonian Institution for 10 years.”

McCook is the great-great grandson, by adoption, of Chipeta and Chief Ouray. “We’re going to put QR codes periodically along the mural so that people with smart phones, especially children, can take a pop off the code and it will kick them right over to the website, which will tell the story of what’s pictured,” said Scott Stearman, chairman of the WPAA. The stories will be narrated by locals.

From photos at the Ute Pass Histori-cal Society, Sprague has drawn histori-cal scenes, including one from the Mid-land Railroad days. “Here’s the Methodist

Church (on Henrietta Street) and here is a scene from the rodeo day and the Ute Trail Stampede,” Sprague said.

Another scene, around the Woodland Hotel shows a baseball game. “It was illegal to play baseball in the Springs on Sundays so they had a baseball fi eld in front of the hotel,” she said.

With dude ranches, rodeo queens, cars and horses “parked” along Midland Avenue, the mural is a history lesson in images.

Currently, the arts alliance is conduct-ing a fundraiser to complete the project. Donors have the option of having their por-traits in the mural, which concludes the his-tory lesson in the 1950s. “I’ll have one day where I take photographs of all the people we’re adding in,” she said. “I’ll be painting all summer during activities.”

The fi rst recipient of a donation is Wood-land Park Police Chief Bob Larson on his horse. Larson retired last week and the gift was a tribute from people in the commu-nity steered by the police department. “The portraits will be part of the crowd,” Stea-rman said.

The Historical Mural Fundraising Cam-paign for the fi rst phase of the mural ends May 17. Donations can be made by visit-ing www.kickstarter.com and searching “Woodland Park Mural.”

Lois Sprague and Scott Stearman hung the pencil drawing of the mural, “The Story of Us,” in the Eichman Gallery last week. The mural, a project of the Woodland Park Arts Alliance, will be painted on the east wall of the Ute Pass Cultural Center. The WPAA seeks funding for the public art project; donations can be made by visiting www.kickstarter.com and searching “Woodland Park Mural.” The campaign ends May 17. Photo by Pat Hill

Hail closes U.S. Highway 24 Saturday Minor mudslide impacted ramp into Manitou Springs Sta� report

U.S. Highway 24 in the Cascade area was closed due to excessive hail in a short

period of time on Saturday from about 1:40 p.m. to 3:40 p.m, according to Colorado Department of Transportations offi cials.

“The minor mudslide impacted only the ramp/road from U.S. 24 to Manitou Avenue on the west end of Manitou Springs - U.S. Highway 24/Business,” said CDOT offi cials in a release.

“The Colorado Department of Trans-portation is closely monitoring the Front Range and mountains as anticipated storm could drop up to two feet of snow in the high country and cause fl ooding in the foothills along the Front Range,” said CDOT before the weekend.

“With fl ood watches and advisories

already in place for counties throughout northeastern, southeastern and central Colorado, CDOT crews have begun patrol-ling roadways vulnerable to fl ooding such as US 24/Ute Pass and roadways impacted by the September 2013 fl oods. Should it be necessary to protect the traveling public, CDOT will close roadways or bridges.”

Police catch area robbers For the Courier

On the night of Tuesday, April 28, and the

morning of Wednesday, April 29, Chimayo Turquoise shop and the Woodland Pawn and Loan as well as 21 storage units on Colo. 67 in Woodland Park were broken into and items stolen. On May 1, the Woodland Park Police Department received informa-tion that a business in Manitou Springs had been contacted by an individual who wanted to sell items similar to jewelry sto-len from Chimayo.

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Pikes Peak Courier 3 May 13, 2015

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Mural project in high gear

Lois Sprague and Scott Stearman hung the pencil drawing of the mural, “The Story of Us,” in the Eichman Gallery last week. The mural, a project of the Woodland Park Arts Alliance, will be painted on the east wall of the Ute Pass Cultural Center. The WPAA seeks funding for the public art project; donations can be made by visiting www.kickstarter.com and searching “Woodland Park Mural.” The campaign ends May 17. Photo by Pat Hill

Police catch area robbers For the Courier

On the night of Tuesday, April 28, and the

morning of Wednesday, April 29, Chimayo Turquoise shop and the Woodland Pawn and Loan as well as 21 storage units on Colo. 67 in Woodland Park were broken into and items stolen. On May 1, the Woodland Park Police Department received informa-tion that a business in Manitou Springs had been contacted by an individual who wanted to sell items similar to jewelry sto-len from Chimayo.

Acting on this information, arrange-ments were made to meet and determine if these were the stolen items. After positive identifi cation of the stolen items two indi-viduals were arrested after a short foot pur-suit through Manitou Springs.

Brandon Wilson, 19, and Corey Stevens, 22, were booked into the Teller County Jail. On May 4, two search warrants were ex-ecuted on a vehicle and residence and ad-ditional items reported as stolen or used were located.

A third individual, James Hayes, 21, was arrested and also booked into the Teller

County Jail in con-nection with these cases. The investi-gation is still ongo-ing and anyone who has not contacted the Woodland Park Police Department regarding items sto-len from the storage units, do so to assist in the investigation by calling 687-9262. Hayes Stevens Wilson

Ride of Silence raises safety awareness By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

A solemn event, the annual Ride of Silence in Woodland Park is a tribute to cyclists who have been injured or killed by motorists in the past year. “It’s a short slow-paced ride to raise aware-ness for cycling safety,” said Jackie

Grabbert, secretary of the Mountain Top Cycling Club which sponsors the event.

In Colorado, 10 cyclists were killed by motorists last year.

Mayor Neil Levy opens the event with a proclamation at 6:30 p.m. May 20 at the Pavilion in downtown Wood-land Park, followed by a ceremony that distinguishes the ride. “The Riderless Bike is a symbol of those riders who

are no longer with us,” Grabbert said.Each entrant will tie a ribbon on

the bike, which will be passed down the tunnel of participants. “That sets the tone for the ride,” Grabbert said.

The ride is free but participants are asked to register at GetEvent.com. “We’ll do the post-ride at the Pavilion,” Grabbert said.

The ride is 3.5 miles through Woodland Park.

The Ride of Silence is May 20 in Wood-land Park; the event is sponsored by the Mountain Top Cycling Club. Courtesy image

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WPMS offers Academic Teams and a wide variety of athletic team sports.

Woodland Park Middle School provides a safe and focused educational

experience through ROAR principles: Respect, Ownership, Achievement, Relationships

Exploratory Opportunities include:

For more information 686-2200 or www.wpsdk12.org

Competitive RoboticsNational Junior Honors SocietyForensicsBuilders ClubGirls STEM

Mountain Bike ClubBook ClubSpirit ClubJazz Band

Students have the opportunity to experienceMarine Lab by traveling to Florida or even enjoy a Europe Trip!

Woodland Park Middle School is a community fostering learning and growth through respect and responsibility.

Students train for active shooter scenario By Kaitlyn Pratt Contributing writer

As school shootings have made the head-lines multiple times in recent years, school districts across the nation have started to realize that old lockdown methods have be-come obsolete. The Woodland Park School District has implemented a new lockdown policy in order to train their students to deal with a potential armed intruder situation. While old lockdown policies focused on hiding and waiting for the police, the new ALICE program is completely different; stu-dents and staff are learning how to actively respond in an active shooter situation.

“Myself as a parent, I would much rather have my kid fi ghting for their lives instead of sitting in a corner being a victim. That is the message that goes out very clearly- we are not going to lay down and let you come in and hurt people in our building. We are going to take a stand and fi ght back,” said Sean Goings, the Safety and Security Coor-dinator for the Woodland Park School Dis-trict.

ALICE stands for Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate. Alerts are anything that warns the students and staff of an intruder. Lockdown involves locking the door and turning out the lights, as has been done

before, but now students are being taught to barricade the door to make it diffi cult for an intruder to enter. Inform means that students and staff are being kept up to date on the location of an intruder in order to facilitate safe evacuations. Counter is a last resort, but could be a lifesaving action. Students are being taught to arm them-selves with anything they can fi nd in the classroom; from textbooks to tissue boxes to throw at the intruder in order disorient and distract him or her. The students are taught to then either subdue the intruder, or evacuate.

The Woodland Park High School Drama department put together a training video to demonstrate the ALICE strategies. The stu-dents are now doing drills regularly so that they will be prepared to fall back on that training if a violent situation were to occur.

“We do fi re drills every month mandated by the state, and in 56 years we have not lost a child to a fi re in a school building. Why? Because we train. But every month we lose children to violence in schools, and there hasn’t been an emphasis in training for that,” said Sean Goings.

The ALICE program provides a strategy that allows students and staff to play an ac-tive role in their survival until the police ar-rive.

• “It takes the police department 2 to 5

min to respond so we are giving the people in our buildings the tools to survive un-til the police get there and neutralize that threat,” said Sean Goings.

• The ALICE program was implemented at the beginning of the 2014-2015 school year, though it has been in the works for the last three years. So far the response of

students, parents, and staff has been mostly positive.

• “Their level of empowerment was in-stant and amazing. You saw a change in ‘I’m actually going to do something instead of just hide in a corner.’ It was really cool to watch that and it carried on to every build-ing,” said Sean Goings.

The Woodland Park School District has implemented a new lockdown policy in order to train their students to deal with a potential armed intruder situation. Photo by Kaity Pratt

Brovetto awarded for service to WP Council appoints new planning commissioner, approves defense of lawsuit By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

On May 7, Woodland Park City Council recognized former Councilmember Gary Brovetto for his service to the city. Mayor Neil Levy said that during Brovetto’s three years on council he had a huge impact on the city’s economic future, especially its downtown.

Brovetto promoted bringing the state’s Main Street Program to the city and contin-ues to promote the formation of a Creative Arts District and development at Woodland Station. Brovetto encouraged the city to continue to support these projects.

It took three votes, but council appoint-ed former Planning Commissioner Ken Hartsfi eld to the planning commission to replace Phil Mella, who was appointed to city council to replace Brovetto when he re-signed in March.

Woodland Park Mayor Neil Levy gives former Councilmember Gary Brovetto a plaque in recognition of his work on city council promoting the city’s economic development. Photo by Norma Engelberg

Brovetto continues on Page 5

Memorial Park upgrade funding set to go City to re� nance certi� cates of participation, receives a $40K grant

By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

At its May 7 meeting Woodland Park City

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Free resources available at �e Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,

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Students train for active shooter scenario

students, parents, and staff has been mostly positive.

• “Their level of empowerment was in-stant and amazing. You saw a change in ‘I’m actually going to do something instead of just hide in a corner.’ It was really cool to watch that and it carried on to every build-ing,” said Sean Goings.

The Woodland Park School District has implemented a new lockdown policy in order to train their students to deal with a potential armed intruder situation. Photo by Kaity Pratt

Brovetto awarded for service to WP

Hartsfi eld was one of three applicants. The others were Robin Pasley, who also ap-plied to serve on council when Mella was selected, and George Long, a retired U.S. Army Colonel and a former Woodland Park teacher. The fi rst vote ended with three votes for Hartsfi eld and a tie between Pasley

and Long. The second vote eliminated Long and the third vote ended with four votes for Hartsfi eld and three votes for Pasley.

Council authorized City Attorney Erin Smith to defend the city from a lawsuit fi led by Dale and Debbie Carley, whose rental property was fl ooded in November 2013 when a city-owned water main broke. The suit for more than $100,000 in damages was fi led in Teller County Combined Court on April 22.

Auditor Wendy Swanhorst of Swanhorst & Company and city Finance Director Wal-

lie Dingwell presented the annual audit for 2014. Swanhorst said that, as usual, the city had a clean audit.

The only problem she found was with the way the city handled grant money, a minor problem she chalked up to inexpe-rience. This was Dingwell’s fi rst year as fi -nance director.

Council approved a new beer and wine license for Paul Lavigne for Wild Wings & Things. Lavigne assured council that he will serve alcohol responsibly and that the “Chicken Man” is here to stay. Both he and

his wife have donned the chicken costume and held up signs and danced on the edge of U.S. 24 in front of the Safeway Plaza. He said it was a lot of fun and that his wife is better at it than he is.

Council also proclaimed its support for the Mountain Top Cycling Club Ride of Si-lence on May 20 to honor cyclists who have been injured or killed while riding on public roads and highways. This ride has become an international event since its inception in 2003.

Continued from Page 4

Brovetto

Memorial Park upgrade funding set to go City to re� nance certi� cates of participation, receives a $40K grant

By Norma Engelberg Contributing writer

At its May 7 meeting Woodland Park City

Council approved the refi nance of certifi -cates of participation for the public works building and the 1999 construction of a new police station. The refi nance will include funding for Memorial Park renovations that are slated to cost about $2.5 million.

The city was going to use both the pub-lic works and police operations building as collateral for the park renovations but now

will only be collateralizing the police struc-ture, worth about $3.5 million.

With work on the park pending, several events that usually take place in the park have been moved to different venues. These include the annual citywide cleanup, the summer Farmers Markets, the Old Fash-ioned Fourth of July and the Cruise Above the Clouds Car Show.

A $40,000 grant from Fishing is Fun will help pay for work on the Memorial Park Pond, which will be reshaped and deep-ened so that the water will stay cool enough for fi sh to survive in the summer.

Bonds are also going on sale to fund the Woodland Aquatic Center at a lower than expected interest rate.

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719-687-0680

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669) to learn more.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669) to learn more.

Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669) to learn more.

Celebrating the life of Johnny PritchardLazy Old Dogs has played its last gig

By Pat [emailprotected]

The Crystola Bar and Grill was packed the evening of May 4 when more than 300 people gathered to celebrate the life of the late Johnny Pritchard.

Pritchard, 78, died April 1 and with his death, the band,

Lazy Old Dogs, has played its last performance. “I’m done,” said the drummer Rob McArthur. ̀ It’s too sad without John-ny.”

McArthur and Pritchard, along with Cy Sumner, were known for their performances at retirement homes, saloons and special events. “The Lazy Old Dogs band was formed around Johnny’s voice and Cy Sumner’s saxophone,” McAr-thur said. “It is ironic that it should all end exactly 5 years later, in the same place (Crystola) with the same venue.”

Pritchard was known for his repertoire of 1,000 songs, to which he had instant recall, McArthur said. “Johnny was one of the best people I ever knew, and I know that sounds like a cliché but, in his case, he truly was,” he said. “He was quick to smile, and was singing to the nurses in the hospital during his final days. He had a passion for life and for music that will remain unparalleled.”

From now on, a band from Colorado Springs, Old Dog Band, will play at the Crystola on Monday nights.

With the death of Johnny Pritchard, the Lazy Old Dogs have bid farewell, at least for now, to performing. Courtesy imageJohnny Pritchard, one of the Lazy Old Dogs, loved playing his guitar. Pritchard’s life was celebrated May 4 at the Crystola Bar and Grill. Courtesy photo

WHAT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK? Want to know what clubs, art exhibits, meetings and cultural events are happening in your area and the areas around you?Visit www.coloradocommunitymedia.com/calendar.

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OPINIONY O U R S & O U R S

Looking back on the ABA’s Denver Rockets I had the pleasure of interviewing for-

mer Denver Nuggets star basketball player, head coach and Basketball hall of Fame member Dan Issel last week at the 30th An-nual Colorado Springs Leadership Prayer Breakfast at the Colorado Springs Marriott. It was the second time I’ve interviewed Is-sel in the last 10 years and each time he has been very cordial.

I was a big basketball fan as a small tike beginning in the late 1960s. I followed the NBA very closely, especially the Lakers with Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry West and Elgin Baylor.

Issel, of course, didn’t play in the NBA until his sixth professional season. That’s because after graduating from the Univer-sity of Kentucky in 1970, he chose to sign with the Kentucky Colonels of the Ameri-can Basketball Association.

Issel was drafted by the NBA’s Detroit Pistons, but elected to sign with the rogue ABA.

The ABA was around for nine seasons (1967-68 to 1975-76). As a kid growing up in southern California, I was much bigger fan of the NBA; especially the Lakers. I real-ize the Lakers are not a fan favorite of folks here in Colorado; especially long-time (50-plus years) residents of the state.

But if you were a kid growing up in southern California back in the day, it was tough not to love Chamberlain, West, Bay-lor, Gail Goodrich, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, James Worthy and Jamaal Wilkes. Those Lakers teams from the late 1960s through the late 1980s were pretty special.

The ABA had a team in southern Cali-fornia, but few people really cared about them. The Anaheim Amigos were a charter team of the ABA and played in Orange

County for one season.The Amigos were not successful on the

court. They lost their fi rst fi ve games, in-cluding the fi rst-ever ABA game; a 134-129 loss to the Oakland Oaks on the road. After losing two thirds of their fi rst 36 games head coach Al Brightman was fi red and replaced by Harry Dinnel.

The Amigos fi nished the season with 25 wins and 53 losses, fi fth place in Western Division.

They Amigos averaged just 1,293 fans per home game and their games were broadcast on radio and sometimes on tele-vision. However, they lost approximately $500,000 on the season and were sold for $450,000 to James J. Kirst, who moved the team to the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena, where they became the Stars.

But after two seasons in Los Angeles, the Stars relocated again — this time to Salt Lake City — and became the Utah Stars.

I was a huge fan of Issel’s from the time he played his fi rst ABA game. I didn’t see a lot of ABA games on television, but I collected basketball cards and loved those colorful jerseys and the unique red, white and blue basketball. The ABA also had the three-point shot long before the NBA adapted it.

In the spring of 1967, Denver received a charter ABA franchise by default when the original owners of the Kansas City franchise couldn’t get their act together in time. The league needed solid ownership for the franchise, which it eventually found in the form of Denver trucking executive Bill Ringsby.

Ringsby was the owner of the Denver-based “Ringsby Rocket” Trucking System. Therefore, it made sense for the team to be nicknamed the “Rockets.” The team’s unique colors (orange and black) and logo (the “Ringsby System” logo) were borrowed directly from Ringsby’s trucks.

The team’s fi rst year on the court (1967-68) was considered mildly successful. Only 2,748 fans attended the Rockets’ fi rst home game against the Amigos. But attendance picked up over the course of the season as Colorado residents gradually warmed up to their new pro team. In their inaugural sea-son, the Rockets averaged a healthy 4,128 fans per game. This fi gure encouraged the Ringsbys and confi rmed that Denver could, indeed, support a pro basketball franchise.

The Rockets were good, but not great. They had two powerful offensive weapons; Larry Jones, who played for Wilkes-Barre of the old Eastern League, and Willie Murrell (also from the Eastern League).

Jones was one of the quickest and best shooting guards in the ABA. On Nov. 28, 1967, he scored 52 points at home against the Oaks. He averaged 22.8 points per game that fi rst year, and was named First-Team All-ABA. Despite Jones’ spectacular play, Murrell was voted the team’s MVP. Murrell averaged 16.4 points and 9.0 re-

Summers continues on Page 7

Overshadowed by war The threat of being drawn into to World

War II was hanging heavy over the United States when Divide rancher Sumner Alfred Osborn went missing in October of 1941.

The fi rst indication that something was terribly wrong surfaced when Sumner Os-born’s mother, Mrs. A.H. Osborn, 215 South 11th Street, called Sheriff Sam Deal’s offi ce.

Undersheriff Roy Glasier investigated and was told by Mrs. Osborn that on the night of Oct. 16, a man she did not know, came to her house and requested S.A. Osborn’s mail, saying that he had been instructed by Osborn to pick it up. There was no mail that day, so he returned the next, and she gave him a letter: She told Glasier that the letter had not been sealed properly and she looked in it, seeing a check made out to Sumner Osborn for $55.62, according to a 1962 account related by Carl F. Mathews. Mathews worked on unsolved crimes as superintendent of the Bureau of Identifi cation in the Colorado Springs Police Department for years before he retired in 1952.

“The man told her that he and Osborn had sold a load of posts to the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo and the check was in pay-ment, Glaiser investigated further and found the check had been made out for the sale of four horses to the zoo: the check was traces and endorsem*nt was found to have been forged by one of the trio (George Marion Betts, John Cahill and Lester Cahill, brothers, all of Divide) and cashed at the Broadmoor Garage on Oct. 17,” Mathews related in his paper about unsolved crimes.

Sheriff Deal was immediately in touch with Sheriff Cecil Markley at Cripple Creek and a trip was made to Osborn’s ranch. The last time that Sumner Osborn was seen was Oct. 16, when he walked to neighbor’s ranch and asked if someone could take him to the highway as he wanted to go to Colorado Springs to report that four horses had been stolen. Unable to get ride, he continued on foot.

“Betts in his confession admitted he went to Mrs. Osborn’s home and obtained the check after Lester Cahill brought him from Divide. He said Johnny Cahill endorsed the check but that he and Lester stayed in the auto while Johnny went into into the garage to get the money.”

The Cahills also, according to the con-fession, drove the herd of 14 Osborn cattle to the the Cahill ranch, loaded in a truck,

and took them to the stockyards in Denver and sold them for $599.99.

“Betts declared the check was made out to ‘Earl Osborn’ and the two Cahills went to a Denver bank and cashed it. He asked the Cahills where Osborn was and they said they didn’t know.”

A heavy snow covered the region and made a search for Osborn diffi cult. By Nov. 2, Sheriff Markey had made the determina-tion that foul play had occurred. A $100 reward was offered.By Nov. 4, Lester Cahill indicated that he wanted to plead guilty to the cattle rus-tling, and authorities had been question-ing both the Cahills, but they insisted that did know what had happened to Osborn. Lester admitted selling the cattle, but John denied any involvement.

By Nov. 6, Sheriff Deal, acting on a hunch, surveyed an abandoned mine pit called the Little Annie. the 300-foot shaft had the reputation of being a ‘bad hole’ and full of water at the bottom and plagued by deadly gas fumes in the bot-tom. The tried to lower a miner down into the shaft in a bucket but abandoned that effort when more bad weather arrived. a second attempt later, using more equip-ment, including a portable winch. George Gotham went down to 110-foot level, but declared the effort useless with such a short cable.

The next day, another experienced miner, Andy Kuhlman, was lowered to 250 feet, but said he found no gas, no water, and no body.

“He reported he descended to a point where the old timbers had fallen from the top and closed the lower part. The next day, Frank Mayes, deputy game warden, his nephew Fred, Willis White, nephew of Osborn, and Andy Kuhlman explored and ice cave east of Midland some 60 feet deep, known to but a few residents. And also and old mining tunnel, 600 feet deep, but

without results. They reported the area was full of abandoned workings, many of which had not been touched for years,” wrote Mathews in his unsolved crimes paper.

By Nov. 15, the Cahill brothers were will-ing to plead guilty to the horse and cattle theft but when questioned repeatedly on the whereabouts of Osborn “they had nothing to say.” By the end of the month, they were charged, as was Betts, who was only involved in the horse theft.

“On Dec. 5, Harry Sollo, a real estate agent and self-styled ‘student of psychic phenomena’ said had received a ‘mes-sage’ which ‘told him within a half-mile of where Osborn’s body was lying.’ He said he would leave an envelop, sealed and not to be opened until Monday, giving the loca-tion so the accuracy of the message could be proved after the search,” according to Mathew’s account.

That following Sunday, a procession of about 70 cars that included Sollo and four sisters of Osborn, was taken to a spot fi ve miles east of the Cahill ranch, but the ‘stu-dent of psychic phenomena’ claimed they were taken to the wrong spot. And while they were, the body was being removed.

According to a message left at the Gazette and Telegraph offi ce later, “the body was in a well fi ve miles east of the Cahill place; Sollo also claimed that he had received information giving the actual location, and that Osborn had been shot with a revolver and beaten to death.”

From that time on, after the dry psychic hole, the Osborn case was overshadowed by news of the war, and in effect, moved to the back burners of local investigation.

At their cattle rustling trial in Febru-ary, the state Brand Inspector Earl Brown, testifi ed that one of men selling the cattle, fi lled out paperwork that the car they were driving belonged to Alf Coulsen, a former Teller County Commissioner, and that the driver was “Earl Osborn,” a brother of Sum-ner Osborn, who had been been dead for a year or more at the times the crimes were committed. The case went to jury, and the Cahills were sentenced to terms of eight and 10 years. Betts, only involved in the horse theft, received probation. The Cahills served their terms at the Colorado State Penitentiary, and were later released.Sumner Alfred Osborn’s body was never found.

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

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Black Forest � re survivors received 10,000 trees Groups combine e� orts Sta� report

On Saturday, May 9, 238 Black Forest

families picked up free seedling trees to help restore their burned land.

A total of 10,000 trees have been donat-ed to Black Forest fi re survivors, through the combined efforts of the Colorado State Forest Service, the Arbor Day Foundation, FedEx, the National Wildlife Federation and Black Forest Together.

Black Forest Together volunteers worked side-by-side with FedEx volunteers, Colo-rado State Forest Service personnel, and Black Forest Fire/Rescue fi refi ghters to di-rect traffi c through the pickup area, and load each family’s pre-reserved trees.

Partnerships and grants have made this tree giveaway possible.

The cost of growing 5,000 of the seed-

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Pikes Peak Courier 9 May 13, 2015

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OBITUARIES

Place an Obituary for Your Loved One.

Private303-566-4100

[emailprotected]

Funeral HomesVisit: www.memoriams.com

In Loving Memory

Kristin Elizabeth McLain died April 27, 2015, during a helicopter rescue mission in Austin, TX. She is survived by her partner, Winston Merrill; parents, Betty and Jerry McLain of Woodland Park; sister, Stacey McLain Dyer; nephew, Hunter; niece, Makalynne; brother-in-law, Mike Dyer, all of Fort Collins; Swanee Ballman, aunt; Ronald Ballman, uncle; Don McLain, uncle; Judy McLain, aunt and numerous cousins.

Kristin was born in Colorado Springs February 10, 1969, and grew up at Sanborn Western Camps at Florissant. She attended school at Woodland Park K-12 where she

played varsity basketball, graduating in 1987.

Kristin received a degree in Equine Science at Colorado State University and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at the University of Northern Colorado in 2001. She worked in the ER at Denver Health Medical Center and at Flight For Life of Colorado in Denver and Summit County as a flight nurse.

In 2008 Kristin moved

to Austin and began her career with Star Flight as a flight nurse /paramedic. In her spare time she enjoyed cooking, gardening, trail running, cycling, working out, mountain biking, wake-surfing, and paddle boarding. She completed numerous marathons, an Ironman triathlon and loved endurance paddleboard events.

She had discipline and persistence combined with a caring, loving heart. Her tenacity was inspiring, but the heart that created it, tender and generous.

Kristin loved flying, understood the risks that went with her rescue work, yet followed her heart to do what she loved.

McLain Kristin Elizabeth McLainFebruary 10, 1969 - April 27, 2015

bounds for the season.Other standout original Rockets were

Byron Beck (out of Denver University), Wayne Hightower (from the Detroit Pis-tons of the NBA), Lefty Thomas (from the Harlem Clowns), Julian Hammond (out of Tulsa), and Tom “Whammy” Bowens (out of Grambling).

Under head coach Bob Bass, Denver fi nished a respectable 12 games above .500 and third place in the Western Division. Denver played the powerful New Orleans Buccaneers (led by Coach Babe McCarthy and All-Stars Doug Moe and Larry Brown).

At New Orleans, the Rockets lost the fi rst two games of the best-of-fi ve series. They also lost Jones to a broken arm. The series seemed over, but the Rockets sur-prised everyone by winning the next two games of the series, both played in Denver. In the absence of Jones, Murrell shoul-dered the scoring burden in Game 4 at the Denver Coliseum, scoring 14 points in the fi rst seven minutes of the fourth quarter, and 28 in the game to propel Denver to the series-tying win. The rubber game of the series was played back in New Orleans, where the Bucs nipped Denver, 102-97.

The Bucs eliminated Dallas in the conference fi nals and almost defeated the Pittsburgh Pipers, led by Connie Hawkins,

in the fi rst ABA Championship Series.Long before Issel became one of the

most popular Nuggets of all time, there was Spencer Haywood. The 6-foot-9 Haywood had played only two years of college bas-ketball, one at Trinidad Junior College and the other at the University of Detroit.

But having averaged 32.2 points per game at Detroit (he was an All-America choice as a sophom*ore), and having sparked the U.S. Olympic Basketball Team to a gold medal performance at the 1968 Mexico City Summer Games, Haywood was bored with college ball. Despite protests from the NCAA and the NBA (and even some ABA owners), Haywood was allowed to play for the Rockets. Team ownership publicly explained it as a “hardship” exception, designed to allow Haywood to provide for his large family (including his mother and nine brothers and sisters).

Haywood led the Rockets to a 51-33 regular season record during the 1969-70 campaign and averaged 30 points and 19.5 rebounds per game. At the ABA All-Star Game in Indianapolis, he won the MVP award. And at the end of the season, he was voted the overall ABA MVP (also mak-ing the All-ABA First Team), and the ABA Rookie of the Year.

The Rockets defeated Rock Barry (who lives in the Broadmoor area) and the Oaks in the fi rst round of the playoffs, but lost to the L.A. Stars in the second round.

By the next season Haywood moved onto the Seattle Supersonics (now Okla-homa City Thunder) of the NBA.

Continued from Page 6

Summers

Moderate exercise may make cancer treatments more e� ective

This hot off the press from Kansas State University … moderate exercise may make cancer treatments more effective. Brad Behnke, associate professor of exercise physiology and a team of kinesiology re-searchers have demonstrated that moder-ate exercise on a regular basis enhances the fl ow of oxygen to cancerous tumors.

This tumor oxygenation helps de-stroy cancer cells, which the researchers believe will enhance treatments for cancer patients, including radiation treatments. According to Behnke, when a tumor has low oxygen, it is often very aggressive.

As a result, hypoxic tumors tend to be resistant to traditional cancer therapies, such as radiation therapy. “If we can in-crease the effi cacy of radiation treatment, then the patient’s prognosis is enhanced,” says Behnke.

“Exercise is a type of therapy that ben-efi ts multiple systems in the body and may permanently alter the environment within the tumor,” he continued. “Because oxygen is a radiosensitizer, it helps destroy cancer

cells.”The key to exercise aiding radiation

treatments is that it be moderate. Too little exercise may have no effect and too much may have a negative effect shutting down blood fl ow to the tumor or impairing the immune system in general.

Moderate exercise is defi ned by Behnke as an activity that employs 30 to 60 percent of one’s aerobic capacity. Using age-pre-dicted exercise target heart rate, that for-mula would be 220 minus your age times 30 percent for the lower range and times 60 percent for the upper.

Divide that number by 6 and you have your target heart rate for 10 seconds. Exercise heart rate is taken at your carotid artery with your index and middle fi nger.

For most people that intensity can be accomplished with a brisk walk or a slow jog. The American Cancer Society recom-mends 30 to 60 minutes of exercise at least 5 days a week.

Start slowly and progress moderately. If you’re in treatment or are a cancer survi-vor who has not been exercising regularly, begin with as little as ten minutes at 30 percent of your aerobic capacity.

You don’t have to run out and join a gym. Take the stairs, instead of riding the elevator.

Park your car at the far end of the park-ing lot, when shopping. Buy a pedometer and increase your number of steps daily in small increments.

In short, what the K-State research results tell us is that you can help the ef-fi cacy of your cancer treatment by simply moving.

That advice reminds me of Professor Matsui in my Biology 101 class at the Uni-versity of Delaware in 1964. He walked to the blackboard and without saying a word proceeded to write the seven requirements for something to be included in the study of Biology.

The very fi rst item was … “Does it Move.” If it doesn’t move, then it’s not alive and therefore will not be included in the study of Biology.

To those of you who are fi ghting the battle with the beast and those of you who are cancer survivors, the message is clear … get moving!

Cord Prettyman is a certifi ed Master Person-al Trainer and owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Wood-land Park. He can be reached at 687-7437, by email at [emailprotected] or though his website at www.cordprettyman.com.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor:This is a note to say Thank You to the

two good Samaritans who found me un-conscious at the Woodland Park post offi ce on April 22nd and called an ambulance to haul me away. I especially appreciate that they took the envelope I was holding and mailed it for me. I am out of the hospital

now, no worse for wear except for a few more scars to show for the episode. I’m sorry nobody seems to have gotten your names or I would try to make this a little more personal!

Again, thanks for the assist!Don Hupfer

Woodland Park

Black Forest � re survivors received 10,000 trees Groups combine e� orts Sta� report

On Saturday, May 9, 238 Black Forest

families picked up free seedling trees to help restore their burned land.

A total of 10,000 trees have been donat-ed to Black Forest fi re survivors, through the combined efforts of the Colorado State Forest Service, the Arbor Day Foundation, FedEx, the National Wildlife Federation and Black Forest Together.

Black Forest Together volunteers worked side-by-side with FedEx volunteers, Colo-rado State Forest Service personnel, and Black Forest Fire/Rescue fi refi ghters to di-rect traffi c through the pickup area, and load each family’s pre-reserved trees.

Partnerships and grants have made this tree giveaway possible.

The cost of growing 5,000 of the seed-

lings was provided by the Arbor Day Foun-dation’s Community Tree Recovery pro-gram, an ongoing effort that is currently supporting community disaster recovery in 11 states. FedEx is a National Program Sponsor of the Community Tree Recovery program.

The cost of the other 5,000 seedlings was provided by the Wildlife Enhancement Pro-gram of the National Wildlife Federation.

The CSFS Woodland Park District select-ed fi ve tree species for this giveaway: Pon-derosa Pine, Douglas-Fir, Quaking Aspen, Limber Pine, and Colorado Blue Spruce. All seedlings were grown in the CSFS Nursery in Fort Collins.

To better reach families affected by the Black Forest Fire, the CSFS Woodland Park District partnered with Black Forest Togeth-er to organize a single process to distribute all 10,000 trees. Each family whose land has been burned was allowed to reserve up to 50 seedlings.

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Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (10)

10 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

10

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ARTS AND SCIENCES AT UTE PASS ELEMENTARY

Posters elevate student art For three days last week, Teller County residents showed up at various times to judge the student entrants in the poster contest. With a range of subjects, each promoting the theme “Elevate Your Education,” the artists showed a � air for creativ-ity. The posters were displayed in the administration building of the Woodland Park School District. The winner is expected to be announced at the school board meeting May 13. Judging 187 posters with a theme of “Elevate Your Education” is no easy task. From left, Peggy Gonzales, Dianna Trimble and Amy Nieman. Photo by Pat Hill

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (11)

Pikes Peak Courier 11 May 13, 2015

11

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Posters elevate student art For three days last week, Teller County residents showed up at various times to judge the student entrants in the poster contest. With a range of subjects, each promoting the theme “Elevate Your Education,” the artists showed a � air for creativ-ity. The posters were displayed in the administration building of the Woodland Park School District. The winner is expected to be announced at the school board meeting May 13. Judging 187 posters with a theme of “Elevate Your Education” is no easy task. From left, Peggy Gonzales, Dianna Trimble and Amy Nieman. Photo by Pat Hill

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12 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

12-Life

LIFEP I K E S P E A K

Community bids farewell to chiefBy Pat [emailprotected]

More than 200 people said goodbye to Woodland Park Police Chief Bob Larson May 5 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. After 44 years as a law-enforcement officer, Larson is retiring and, with his wife, Chris, plans to move to Charlevoix, Mich.

Praised for his quiet leadership, in-spiration and wisdom, Larson joined the department nearly 36 years ago, serving as chief for the past 16. “Bob Larson has dedicated his life to law enforcement and leaves a department that is well-run, well-equipped and fully understands the role of policing in a small mountain town,” said David Buttery, city manager and master of ceremonies.

A parade of accolades was an insight to Larson’s intrinsic leadership abilities.

“I enjoy Bob’s wisdom, his wisdom his wit - it’s as dry as a west Texas breeze,” Buttery said. “He’s been a wise counsel to me through many cases, officer-involved

shootings, fires, floods; he was always there to give me sound advice so that we could make the best decisions for our commu-nity.”

Deputy Chief Miles de Young referred to Larson as a pillar of the law-enforcement community. “His leaving is going to be felt,” he said. “He’s so much more than just a police officer.”

Beverly Hodges, the chief’s administra-tive assistant, was emotional. “He is a man of many strengths who led the department into the 21st century,” she said.

Mike Rulo, who preceded the chief as the top cop, pinpointed Larson’s leadership of a team that, in many respects, is like a family.

“You’ve got spouses, significant others, children and dogs, emotional problems, financial problems, things that you are there to support a team working under such difficult conditions,” Rulo said. “Bob is one of the great survivors, dominators of the profession.”

During times of turmoil, Larson steered the team as well as the community through

the Hayman and Waldo Canyon fires, along with the homicides, a few bomb threats, drug labs, parades and fireworks displays, said John Gomes, former deputy chief under Larson and current Teller County Undersheriff.

“In the midst of all of that, the chief provided operations, made sure accidents and drug labs were investigated, made sure criminal investigations happened,” Gomes said. “He guided everybody though that.”

Mayor Neil Levy added a perspective of Larson who, with his family, would have Sunday Brunch at the Swiss Chalet, “I could see in his eyes how much he en-joyed his family - they always came in after church,” said Levy, who owns the restau-rant.

Larson’s quiet leadership provided the community a sense of safety, Levy said. “You’ll be missed and we can never repay what you have done for our community,” he said.

As a permanent sign of gratitude, a painting of Larson on his horse will grace the “History of Us” mural on the east wall

of the Ute Pass Cultural Center.“Chief, this is not just a gift from your

colleagues and friends, this is a statement from the community that says, `thank you,’” said Scott Stearman, sculptor and chairman of the WP Arts Alliance, which sponsors the mural to be designed and painted by Lois Sprague.

After all that praise, Larson was invited up to the podium, where, as expected, his words were brief. “People have said a lot of nice things about me; the stuff we’re talk-ing about are things that we have done, not things that I have done,” he said.

Reflecting on comments from an officer who arrived at the small department after serving in Colorado Springs, Larson repeat-ed the officer’s musings. “He said there’s a big difference here because `people like us,’” Larson said. “We had tough times and good times but people like us. Thank you all.”

And Larson left the stage to a standing ovation from 200 people.

Cripple Creek Police Chief Mike Rulo, left, gave a gag gift to Woodland Park Police Chief Bob Larson – “Here is an autographed photo of me,” Rulo said. Rulo preceded Larson as Woodland Park’s Police Chief. Rulo gave Larson the gift at Larson’s retirement party May 5. Photo by Jim Halloran

Former Woodland Park police chiefs showed up to Chief Bob Larson’s retirement Photo by Pat HillMore than 300 people bid farewell to Woodland Park Police Chief Bob Larson, who is retiring this month. After glowing tributes from o�cials and friends, Larson cut the bake baked by Sweet Escapes bakery in Woodland Park. Photo by Pat Hill

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Pikes Peak Courier 13 May 13, 2015

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Update on the Dachshunds By By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

A story in the April 2 edition of the Courier tells of the rescue of 10 Dachshunds from a home in Cripple Creek. As of last week, seven of the 10 had been adopted. However, in the fi rst part of May, the city’s animal control offi cer found out that there had been 11 dogs in the house.

“The lady’s son let me in and I was able to catch the dog and she is now at the shelter,” said Nancy Mann in an email.

To date, Mann has found homes for 9 of the 11 Dachshunds.As for the elderly homeowner whose “911” call alerted the emergency services, she is

now in a facility in Canon City and doing well, Mann said.

Shannon Lemons, left, DVM with Teller Park Veterinary Service, checks out the teeth of the two dogs, which were rescued and are being cared for by Nancy Mann, Cripple Creek’s animal control o� cer. Wallaby, 4, and Boots, 6, are two of the 10 Dachshunds, or Dachshunds-mix, taken from a home in Cripple Creek. Lemons discounted her prices to treat all 10, each of which had decaying teeth. Boots had been adopted but two still need homes. Photo by Pat Hill

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14 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

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Carver protects El Paso County �ood mitigation projectsSta� report

State Representative Terri Carver’s bill to protect flood mitigation projects passed the Colorado House of Representatives by an overwhelming bipartisan vote.

El Paso County, Colorado Springs, Flying W Ranch, Manitou Springs, and Colorado Department of Transportation have spent over $4 million in detention basins and flood mitigation efforts, to protect our citi-zens from flash flooding in the aftermath of the Waldo Canyon fire.

These essential flood mitigation efforts were put in jeopardy when the Colorado Di-vision of Water Resources (DWR) indicated these efforts might trigger a water court de-cree process, absent a change in state law. The DWR ruling also negatively impacted city and county stormwater drainage infra-structure operations.

Carver joined the efforts by State Sena-tor Sonnenberg and State Representative Winter to protect flood mitigation projects and stormwater infrastructure operations from costly water court adjudications. Carver represents the Mountain Shadows and Peregrine areas affected by the Waldo Canyon fire, and the areas in western Colo-rado Springs, Cascade, and Green Moun-tain Falls impacted by flash flooding in 2012 and 2013.

The bill (SB15-212) clarifies that “post-

wildfire” flood mitigation projects and storm water infrastructure operations do not injure water rights. The bill recognizes the importance of city and county actions to protect lives and property. The bill sets specific criteria for stormwater and post-fire flood mitigation facilities to ensure that downstream water rights are not harmed, without the need to go to water court. This bill was supported by cities and counties across the state. El Paso County, Colorado Springs, Fountain, Manitou Springs, Wood-land Park, Pueblo, and Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments supported the bill.

“We know flash flooding from intense storms over the Waldo Canyon burn scar area are a serious threat to our local com-munities,” stated Carver. “Residents in El Paso and Teller counties have volunteered thousands of hours to assist with debris removal and re-vegetation, after the Waldo Canyon fire.

Our flood mitigation efforts, including the construction of numerous detention basins and other structures, are essential to slowing down the water flow and reducing the flash flooding hazard.

We cannot tie up these life-saving ef-forts in costly, time-consuming water court litigation. I was honored to work with State Senator Jerry Sonnenberg and State Repre-sentative Faith Winter in this bipartisan ef-fort to protect our communities.”

GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS NEWS IN A HURRY

Donkey decision delayedThe Green Mountain Falls board of

trustees delayed a decision on allowing the use of donkeys by Victor Matthews to grind the mash for his Black Bear Distillery. The

board postponed the ruling until the meet-ing June 2. Another decision was delayed on changing the ordinance that forbids the feeding of wildlife, including ducks and geese.

Meeting scheduled on Ute Pass Regional TrailBy Sta� report

El Paso County Parks is hosting the sec-ond public meeting in the master planning process of the Ute Pass Regional Trail and is seeking public input. The public workshop is from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 20, at Centennial Hall, 200 S. Cascade in downtown Colorado Springs.

The meeting will have a presentation of trail alignment alternatives for the five mile trail corridor located west of Manitou Springs in the Cascade�Chipita Park area.

The workshop will be informational for

residents and stakeholders and an opportu-nity to provide input on the Master Plan for the Regional Trail.

For more information about the Ute Pass Regional Trail Master Plan, please contact Julie Gamec with THK Associates Inc. at (303) 770�7201, or at [emailprotected], or contact El Paso County Project Manager Jason Meyer at (719) 520�6985, or at [emailprotected], or visit the webpage at the following address:

http://adm.elpasoco.com/Community-Services/planning/Pages/UtePassRegion-alTrailPlanning.aspx

EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to [emailprotected]. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

MAY 15

COOKING, NUTRITION Learn healthy, budget-friendly recipes in this hands-on class featuring vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Free groceries for every class. The cooking and nutrition workshop is from 3-5 p.m. Friday, May 15, at the Woodland Park Library, 218 E. Midland Ave. Contact Kathy at 719-686-0705 or [emailprotected].

THROUGH MAY 15

JOHNNY JUMP Ups Prospect Home Care & Hospice, 16222 W. U.S. Highway 24, Suite 120, Woodland Park, will start its fundraiser for Johnny Jump Up plants on Monday, April 27. Sale runs through Friday, May 15, with delivery of plants to sign-up location on Tuesday, May 19. Johnny Jump Ups are delightful perennials that brighten the landscape at altitude with their bright, colorful faces. For fundraiser details, contact Janet at 719-687-0549 or [emailprotected].

MAY 15-17

KIDS TO Parks weekend Mueller State Park is teaming up with Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument to get kids into parks. It’s a national e�ort help kids discover the parks near them and enjoy those wonderful resources. Enjoy a weekend full of activities for kids taking place at both Mueller and Florissant Fossil Beds.

FRIDAY, MAY 15: Those Sly Foxes, 8 p.m., Amphitheater. Foxes run freely in our imaginations, folktales, and legends. They are known to be clever, sly, and wily. Remove the mystery and get to know the real fox with interpretive naturalist Penny. Dress warmly.

SATURDAY, MAY 16: Archery for Kids, 10 a.m., Livery. Kids ages 8 and up can learn target archery with close instruction by sta�. We use Colorado Archery in the Schools Program equipment designed for youth.

THINGS TO DO

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (15)

Pikes Peak Courier 15 May 13, 2015

15-Special

By Rob [emailprotected]

t was a different world back then.In 1965, Lyndon Johnson was president, Operation Rolling Thunder has just began in Viet

Nam, civil rights unrest in the States, Charlie Brown (the comic strip) makes the cover of Time magazine.

Here in Woodland Park, an important convergence was taking place. Three forces were emerg-ing on the landscape, that were to forever change the Pikes Peak region.

A bank, an iconic western retail store, and newspaper, opened doors for business — and im-mediately became institutions — that for the next 50 years would weave their way into the fabric

of what means to live above the clouds.With this edition, we salute those 50 years of blood, sweat and tears endured.We mark the successes, rises to challenges, and the dreams, both realized and ‘back-burnered.’We welcome in the next 50 years, expecting nothing less from the venerated institutions they have be-

come, looking always forward to the wonders the years will bring to us at Park State Bank. Cowhand, and the Courier.

May our home always be too small, to hold all of our friends.

I

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (16)

16 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

16-Special

By Pat [emailprotected]

There’s a certain Western romantic theme to the origins of Park State Bank & Trust. Tony Perry, the bank’s president, tells the story that begins in the 1800s when the Thatchers, John and Mahlon, left Pennsyl-vania in a covered wagon and settled down in Pueblo.

“They had a little safe and called it a bank,” Perry said.

The brothers eased into the business by offering “seed” loans to entrepreneurs, sugar farmers, or prospectors, for instance. “By the 1920s the brothers were worth around $20 to $30 million, with banks from New Mexico all the way to Wyoming,” Perry said. “This is the last bank the family owns; they’ve sold all the others over the years.”

In 1891 John Thatcher built the three-story, 24,000 square-foot Rosemount man-sion at 14th and Greenwood for his wife and family. Today, the mansion is a mu-seum, a gift to the city of Pueblo from the Thatcher family.

In Monument, the family of Mahlon Thatcher has endowed the Western Muse-um of Mining.

Today, the bank retains its ties to the Thatchers. “The majority owner, Kit Spahn, is actually third-generation, along with her sisters,” Perry said, adding that Tiffany Spahn is the fourth-generation owner.

The family has historical significance in Colorado. Kit Spahn’s father was an at-torney and her grandfather was the first attorney general in the state. “Kit still lives on the family ranch in Black Forest but spends winters in California; she’s still very involved in the bank,” Perry said.

Park State Bank & Trust TodayFifty years after opening in Woodland

Park the bank retains the home-town touch, one tinged with Western myth and a philosophical culture that ensures vibrancy and vitality.

“What’s cool about the story is that they were always community banks, always sup-portive of the local communities and, more than 100 years later, we’re essentially doing the same thing,” Perry said. “For me, one of my personal check points is that I need to respect who I work for because I put a lot of effort and energy into what I do.”

When the financial crisis that began in 2007 caused economic devastation among business owners, particularly those in the construction industry, the personal aspect played a significant role in the bank’s re-maining vital.

“I respect our shareholders and their commitment to the community, which re-ally showed through in the crisis, where they stepped up and added additional capi-tal to make sure we stayed on a strong foot-ing,” Perry said.

Low-key rather than flamboyant, the shareholders usually stay in the back-ground, Perry said. “But in our 50th year it felt right to spotlight them a little bit, just tell the story.”

The futureIn June 2009, the bank received a cease

That’s former president Bob Eichman in the foreground, who came to town from his home in Utah to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Park State Bank & Trust. Photo by Ken Matthews

Renee Taylor, who owns My Sweet Escape Bakery in Woodland Park, made the cake for the 50th anniversary party April 23 at Park State Bank & Trust. Photo by Ken Matthews

Park State celebrates 50 years

Park continues on Page 17

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Tony Perry, President of Park State Bank & Trust, steered the bank through the Great Recession and severe economic turbulence in Teller County. “I think the crisis made us re-evaluate a lot of things, not only as a bank and a business but as a community and a nation,” he said. “It’s time to re-think how we do some things.” Photo by Rob Carrigan

The bank’s current location on U.S. Highway 24 in downtown Woodland Park. Photo by Rob Carrigan.

and desist order from the Fed-eral Deposit Insurance Corpo-ration. Among the list of general concerns for all banks that re-ceive the order is the lack of suf-ficient capital.

“We’re not quite off the order yet but we’ve done enough work that we’re going to get there this summer after the next exam,” he said. “The positive is that I’ve gone from managing from a defensive posture to protect the bank to being proactive - what are the next 50 years going to look like?”

The Great Recession and the subsequent FDIC order have in-fluenced operations at the bank today.

“As difficult as the last six years have been, I think the cri-sis made us re-evaluate a lot of things, not only as a bank and a business but as a community and a nation,” he said. “It’s time to re-think how we do some

things.”However, during the reces-

sion it was community banks such as Park State that contin-ued to support economic activ-ity, he said. “I think the real chal-lenge for community banks is to find new ways to meet the regu-latory burden of economies of scale,” he said. “We have to find ways to support the community, new ways to support our small businesses and our other cus-tomers.

“I think it’s an exciting chal-lenge, one that can be met. There are some creative things we can do which can change how business is done at a funda-mental level,” he said.

In August 2003, Park State Bank moved from its original location at the corner of U.S. 24 and Highway 67 to the architec-tural gem of glass, timber and stone.

Perry, along with former president, Bob Eichman and several shareholders celebrated the bank’s 50 years with a rib-bon-cutting ceremony April 23.

Continued from Page 16

Park

“We’re not quite o� the order yet but we’ve done enough work that we’re going to get there this summer a�er the next exam. �e

positive is that I’ve gone from managing from a defensive posture to protect the bank to being proactive — what are the next 50 years going to look like?”

Tony Perry

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We would like to thank all of Teller County and the Ute Pass Community for your continued support throughout our fifty years. We are proud to be a part of your community.

We look forward to serving you for another fifty years!

Cowhand looks toward future By Pat Hill [emailprotected]

Despite the tumultuous changes in the retail industry over the past 50 years, The Cowhand retains its hold on the market. “We’ve always tried to accommodate the needs of the community all these 50 years, which is probably why we’re still here,” said Merry Jo Larsen, co-owner with Marty McKenna, of The Cowhand, which cel-ebrates its 50th anniversary this year.

In the years before 83 percent of Teller County residents commuted to work, most of them to Colorado Springs, competition from other businesses popped up occa-sionally. “They come and they go but it’s hard to deal with the chain stores” Larsen said.

With an evolving marketing plan, The Cowhand follows trends in its merchandis-ing model. “We’re going to re-evaluate now, look at our customer base, who lives here now and who needs what?” Larsen said. “I think we’re into hiking and walking shoes and boots, hats that are more outdoors rather than Western; we’ll keep the Western because we still have that customer.”

The re-evaluation is another in a long-standing tradition of fi lling gaps in consumer needs. “We’ve sold furniture, taxidermy things, sporting goods, bath towels, department-store things, because at that time no one had these,” she said.

Known for their Western-themed hats, which today are fashionable even for those who are not part of the horse culture, The

Cowhand distinguishes the city as a class act. “People who aren’t Western who live here - we can give them a unique look that fi ts Woodland Park,” Larsen said.

For merchants who have staying power, some issues never seem to go away. “After 50 years we’re still fi ghting the same things, traffi c, the bypass, locals shopping locally - there are people who still shop in Colorado Springs - and those tax dollars are not sup-porting their community,” Larsen said.

In a time when large chain stores buy merchandise in bulk, The Cowhand banks on personalized customer service and shopping with customers in mind. “It’s our faithful loyal customers - we recognize them and try to get things they want,” she said. “We try to treat customers right because we appreciate them.”

No matter how frustrating the retail business can be, Larsen looks on the bright

side. “It’s little stores like this that can shop around and be more consumer-friendly with the locals,” Larsen said. `It’s an inter-esting store, that’s what our customers tell us.”

As far as the future is concerned, the

mother-daughter duo is staying put. “I don’t know how long that will be, don’t know how bad the traffi c is going to get,” Larsen said. “Marty has no plans and I have no plans to leave. This is our home and we’re proud of our little town.”

Clothes to Cowhand culture, the store has be able to surprise folks for 50 years, and remains part of Woodland Park way of life.

The mother-daughter duo, Marty McKenna and Merry Jo Larsen, are partners in The Cowhand, which celebrates 50 years in Woodland Park this year. Photos by Pat Hill

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Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

Merry Jo Larsen (pictur ed) & Marty McKenna

50th Anniversary CelebrationHuge Sales – Drawings – Free Gifts

Share Your best stories about the Cowhand from their 50 years of business, top 10 WIN gift certificates!

May 1 – May 30, 2015Celebrate with us all year with promotions and activities/drawings!

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE COWHAND, PARK STATE BANK & TRUSTAND PIKES PEAK COURIER – CELEBRATING 50 YEARS!

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The mother-daughter duo, Marty McKenna and Merry Jo Larsen, are partners in The Cowhand, which celebrates 50 years in Woodland Park this year. Photos by Pat Hill

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20 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

Your Community BankAbout Us

The majority shareholders’ family have been involved in community banking in Colorado since the late 1800’s. “From the beginning, they supported entrepreneurs and small businesses,” said Tony Perry, Park State Bank & Trust President & CEO.

Even during the depression there was a legacy of support Even during the depression there was a legacy of support and giving back to their communities. The family donated the Rosemount and its contents to the City of Pueblo. In Colorado Springs they assembled artifacts and made anendowment to create the Western Museum of Mining& Industry.

The commitment by the family to our community was The commitment by the family to our community was demonstrated by the purchase of Park State Bank; a deci-sion that laid the ground work to celebrate today, our 50th Anniversary.

For the last half century, thousands of individual andbusiness customers have turned to their community bank for their financial needs.

Furthermore, the current majority owners of the bankcontinue to honor their heritage and display the samecommitment to community and small businesses.

During the economic crisis, arguably the most dramatic During the economic crisis, arguably the most dramatic economic event in our lifetime, the majority and minority shareholders stayed resolute in their strong support of the bank and of our community. Our customers inspired us during this difficult economic time by fighting and finding new ways to survive the day, then week, then month and eventually years.

We will always look our customers in the eye, take the time We will always look our customers in the eye, take the time to hear their story and look for better ways to serve them and tell them how we can accomplish “Yes”.

As we look to our next 50 years as your community bank, we will continue to find new ways to innovate as well as creative ways to earn and keep your business.

For a list of bank services contact the bank:Call 719.687.9234Call 719.687.9234

Website: www.psbtrust.comFind us on Facebook

“We thank our customers and the entire community for the support over the past five decades.

We are proud to continue to offer unparalleled local service and exper-tise backed by a commitment to you and our community.”

-- Tony PerryPresident & CEO

Park State Bank & Trust

50th Anniversary Celebration -- April 23, 2015The employees and customers have waited 50 years to cut the gold ribbon! Members of the bank’s majority family owners, former and current board members, community leaders and PSB&T officers. Park State Bank & Trust President & CEO Tony Perry, and former PSB&TPresident, Bob Eichman performed the ceremonial ribbon cutting honors. (Courtesy photo CR Chambers Studios)

Pikes Peak Courier 21

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�ree generations have bought boots, hats and moreBy Merry Jo LarsenFor the Courier

The Cowhand is the only 50-year, same-family owned business in Woodland Park. We have sold hats and boots to three generations of families for 50 years. Folks who lived here in the past and returned all say it’s a pleasure to see a landmark/business they still recog-nize.

The changes to our town are “pretty” but they aren’t Woodland Park. The Rodeo and Rodeo arena are gone, the horses are gone, the history of Woodland Park is gone. To the new residents moving to Woodland Park because they love our little town, be very cautious you don’t create the place you came from.

In 1963 the Stulls and Mills owned a riding stable at the end of Paint Pony Country Club Golf Course. We provided horses to Mrs. English and her girls at Camp WaNaka. They had 25-30 head of horses.

At that time you could not buy horse tack in Wood-land Park. The Cowhand started out as a tack store and quickly became a full Western store.

The first Cowhand, in 1965, was in the Wash House (where Curves is now). We remodeled, moved in the end of April 1965. It was very small, about the size of our boot room today. We outgrew that before we even moved in.

Pete Brown had built Browncraft restaurant; he out-grew that and bought the Snake Pit (where Tweeds is today). We moved into the Browncraft log building less than a year later and were there through 1966.

If 50 years determines a landmark, the horse on our roof is just that. He’s the same horse. If my memory serves me right, about four times he’s been taken on a ride or painted. He has been Buckskin, Bay, White, and now, Paint. When he went up as a Paint, we had a nam-ing contest and “Arrow” won. If any of you out there were part of his excursions, we would love to hear the stories. I’m sure it was no easy task getting him off the roof.

The Cowhand moved to our current location in the spring of 1967. It was Clifford’s Grocery store. We moved the store inventory in grocery carts from Les Clark at Circle Soopers. It took all our friends pushing carts to get us into our new home. The dressing rooms were walk-in coolers. The hats were in the meat department. The boot room was the pool hall. There is a lot of history in this old building.

In 1979 the Stulls built a second Cowhand in Colo-rado Springs across from the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. After managing the Cowhand for several years, Lloyd and Merry Jo Larsen bought The Cowhand from her parents, the Stulls, in 1982.

Through those years The Cowhand sponsored Pack-ing Seminars for the hunters and backwoods horse-

men. There were six horses, tents, factory representa-tives and more. It looked like a hunting camp behind The Cowhand.

As well, The Cowhand co-sponsored a horses’ sale that was very successful. It was held at Bergstrom Are-na. We co-sponsored a Longhorn cattle show that drove the cattle down U.S. 24 into the arena. The cattle were unloaded in the arena at Draggin Ass Ranch. Grey Horse Ranch was our horse pasture at that time. The cowboys circled the cattle around the pasture a few times to take the edge off. They brought them up West Street to U.S. 24, turned right, came down “24” to Park and then into Bergstrom Arena. The only casualties were the newly-planted pansies at Mountain National Bank. They were good sports and the show was successful. Fun was had by all.

The Cowhand did “Cowboys with Culture,” an art and fashion show at the Saddle Club. It was a formal Friday night party and sold several art pieces. There was a two-day show that was also successful. Dixie Clare from Florissant invited her artist friends from Okla-homa, Kansas, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico. Thank you, Dixie.

“Cowhand Cattle Drives and Ranch Rodeos” were one of our bigger undertakings; people came from across the United States as well as from other countries. Gary Keck and Deb Grant furnished horses from their Cripple Creek Stables; Carlton and Belinda Brown from Victor were with us for the first two years. It was hard work but we met some nice people and even changed some lives.

We have some great stories. We couldn’t have done the drives and rodeos without Lloyd Larsen — a very heartfelt thank-you to him and all of our friends for their hard work and contributions.

In the late `90s, Marty, my daughter, came home from the Navy. She grew up in The Cowhand, so it was a natural fit for her as a partner. Merry Jo was ready to do something else and close The Cowhand. Marty stepped in, remodeled and restructured operations, gave me a year off (until I decided I wasn’t ready to retire after all). With her enthusiasm and determination to make it to 50 years, here we are.

In spite of a bad economy, Big Box, fires and floods, we have survived. The Cowhand has some very loyal customers and we send a sincere “thank you” for your support. They are why our doors are still open.

Marty and I have no plans of going anywhere. We will be selling reasonably-priced, quality goods for years to come. Our old “sales rep” told me you “you can’t sell out of an empty wagon.”

There are plans all year to celebrate our 50th year, sales, drawings, a street dance and more through New Year’s Eve. Stop by, sign up and see what we’re doing.

By Marty McKenna In 1965 The Cowhand opened at 100 W. Moreno Ave.

It remained there until late 1966; the painted horse Buckskin, fondly referred to as “Buck” stood out front. The business outgrew the building almost as soon as it

moved in and relocated to 200 W. Midland Ave. where it is today. The owners, Howard and Joan Stull, were part-ners with Jerry and Mary Linda Mills on the store and Dude Stables just north of town at the end of the Paint Pony Country Club Golf Course.

As businesses continued to grow, the partnership was dissolved and The Cowhand remained with the Stulls and their daughter, Merry Jo.

Specializing in hard-to-find sizes, shaping hats, stretching boots and making chaps The Cowhand was a regular shop for locals as well as those passing though, especially for the guests who stayed at the Paradise Ranch during its heyday.

Merry Jo returned to work at The Cowhand in 1973 while starting her own family in Divide. The Cowhand hosted numerous style shows at various venues until Bob Yarbough who developed Cripple Creek Mountain Estates approached Howard and Joan to purchase land across from the soon-to-open Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado to build the second Cowhand.

They broke ground in 1978 on the new store, creat-ing the opportunity for Larsen to become manager of the Woodland Park location three years later. The Cow-hand was purchased by the second generation, Merry Jo and Lloyd Larsen, and became the first business account established at Mountain National Bank. The Cowhand sponsored style shows and supported local rodeo queens’ clinics until 1985 when the second loca-tion was closed as Howard and Joan retired.

In 1989 The Cowhand hosted a packing and outfit-ting seminar in the back parking lot, complete with hunting camp, saddles and tack from four different companies, along with Randy and Brenda Myers of Mule Creek Ranch, with six pack horses and a mule. Two certified packing instructors from Wyoming taught the hands-on portion of the seminar for more than 15 participants.

In 1986 they held the longhorn cattle drive and show co-sponsored by the Woodland Park Saddle Club. The cattle were provided by Darrell Dickson’s registered longhorns. The cattle were fathered at the Draggin Ass Ranch, which is now Grey Horse Ranch. The 80 head of Longhorn cattle were driven down West Street to U.S. 24 down Midland Avenue to Park Street and into the Saddle Club grounds. It was a parade of cowboys, hors-es and cows through the downtown business district of Woodland Park. The only casualties were the newly-planted pansies at Mountain National Bank.

In 1993 The Cowhand sponsored the first cattle drives over five years as well as ranch rodeos and a number of brandings.

In 1995 Marty McKenna, the third generation, re-turned from the Navy to resume working at The Cow-hand until 1999 when she took over as manager after Merry Jo’s brief attempt at retirement. Following the renovation of the interior, Merry Jo returned as a series of business-altering events changed the retail land-scape of Woodland Park. Co-owned and operation by Larsen and McKenna, The Cowhand remains family-owned and operated today.

Above, in 1986, The Cowhand co-sponsored, with the Woodland Park Saddle Club, a longhorn cattle drive through Woodland Park. At right, back in the day when Woodland Park was known for its ties to the Old West, horses were a huge part of the rodeo parades, along with the variety of �oats. Courtesy photos

50 years with the same family

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Pikes Peak Courier 23 May 13, 2015

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Park State Bank • The CowhandThe Pikes Peak Courier

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solve your simple to complex insurance needs.”

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687-3094Julie Matthews, Owner/Agent

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Store Hours: (Mon.-Fri.): 7AM - 6PM; (Sat.): 8AM - 4PM

A Happy 50th Anniversary!

Woodland Park School District

Park State BankThe Cowhand

andPikes Peak Courier

wishes

We appreciate your continued supportof your local school district.

M A I N S T R E E T

SHOPDINE

&UNWIND

IN HISTORIC WOODLAND PARK MAIN STREET

city-woodlandpark.org/home/main-street

Congratulations to Park State Bank, The Cowhand and The Pikes Peak Courier for 50

years of exceptional service to our community!

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Amy L. Nieman Broker/Owner

(719) 661-4018

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Congratulations to The Cowhand, Park State Bank and The Pikes

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Congratulations on 50 years of Business

from the Greater Woodland Park

Chamber Members, Board & Staff.

The Cowhand Park State Bank

& Pikes Peak Courier

Thank you for 50 amazing years

of service to your community!

Congratulations on 50 years!

Office of Economic & Downtown Development City-WoodlandPark.org 719-687-6954

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24 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

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Local connection remains strong

By Pat [emailprotected]

Known by the old-timers as the Ute Pass Courier, the weekly newspaper celebrates 50 years this month. While the paper is now called the Pikes Peak Courier, the local connection remains strong.

Today, with one editor and a full-time re-porter, along with a sports writer and a smatter-ing of freelancers, the Courier covers the news and human-interest stories in somewhat the same fashion as always.

From west El Paso County to the entire span of Teller County, the “Courier” has a presence in the communities. People call us with their news, whether sorrow or joyous.

THE SPERRY FAMILYGene Sperry recalls the days when he and his

wife Carol owned the weekly paper from 1978 to 1982. “They printed the paper in Littleton,” he said. “I’d drive the pages up there and wait and then drive back.”

Rain, sleet, hail or snow, Sperry made sure the papers arrived in Woodland Park on time. “Later on, Intermountain Press open a press shop in Colorado Springs; that was better,” he said.

When the Sperrys bought the paper the office was at 108 N. Park, where the Clothes Closet is today. While Gene sold ads, Carol did the bookkeeping. “We hired an editor, Chuck Manson,” Sperry said.

Some of yesterday’s issues remain, Sperry said. “The roads, the snow, people were mad when the snowplows buried their driveways, same as today,” he said.

Letters to the editor always posed a risk; for instance, during a race for sheriff, one of the candidates wrote a letter that Sperry deemed libelous. “I wouldn’t run it,” he said.

Some comments from public officials made Sperry shake his head at times. “One of them told us `you put in what I said, not what I meant,’” he said.

COMMENTS FROM READERSOn the other hand, Clarke Becker, perennial

public official from 1986 to 2003, was chagrined at times over the “what I meant” issue.

“Sometimes I’d think, `oh, did I really say that? That’s not what I meant,’” Becker said. “But Pat (Hill) always had her tape recorder on, so I knew I said it.”

Becker remained good-natured, no matter what was reported. “I’ve always admired your newspaper. But you and Ruth (Zirkle, former editor) were not shy about holding my feet to the fire,” Becker said. “But I knew I could trust you because you both are responsible journal-ists. With other publications I felt I had to be guarded in what I said.”

Becker recalls when he gave Hill a heads-up on the entrance of a large business into the area. “I was honest with you and promised to give you the story when it was time,” he said, referring to Sturman Industries. “It was impor-tant to me to have that announcement in our local newspaper. But we didn’t want anything to happen if we made the news public before it was time.”

Executive director of the Colorado Rural Development Council, today Becker travels all over the state. “Wherever I go I tell public of-ficials to develop a relationship with the press,” he said.

THE PAPER AND ECONOMIC GROWTHBrian Fleer director of community and

economic affairs in the early 1990s, played a key role in the growth of the city. “Woodland Park was a community that was ready to take off, so professionally I was interested in working here,” Fleer said. “We were long over-due from being just a one-grocery store town.”

In those days, when Zirkle was the editor, Fleer’s kids were in the news. “It was always ex-citing to read about our kids,” he said. “I always thought the Courier did a good job reporting on sports, schools and special events. I thought Ruth was top-notch.”

As a quotable public official, Fleer kept track of the paper. “I always thought the Courier did a good job of profiling leaders, which gave you

an understanding of what was going on in the community,” he said. “I always looked at the Courier as representing the pulse of Woodland Park.”

Fleer left his position in in 1995 and, two years ago, returned as the director of Economic and Downtown Development. “I always looked at the Courier as a partner - I still do,” he said.

Under Zirkle, news from the city council was enticing, particularly when Richard Carvel, a sometimes-thorn in the side of the council, showed up. “This community has always had a group of individuals who focused on making the community better,” Fleer said.

In the past few years, the city has been the recipient of significant investments. “Millions of dollars have come into this community, from infrastructure and roads to commercial and housing,” Fleer said. “From 1995 to 2005 we had unprecedented growth and I think the Courier was supportive of that growth cycle, reported on the leaders that made that happen.”

A FORMER EMPLOYEE RECALLS THE GOOD OL’ DAYSPeggy Ezard came to the Courier in 1986,

one of 15 employees that included reporters, ad “reps” and production staff. “We set the type back then,” said Ezard, the paper’s production manager. “We’d pick fonts from strips, put them into the machines; sometimes they’d work, sometimes not.”

In those days, the staff used a large table upstairs to paste the text to the flats. “Every-body helped,” she said. “We developed film in the dark room - we had two full-time photogra-phers.”

In 1998, Ezard and her staff were given Apple II computers. “The computers had little screens; they told us how to turn them on and off and said we’d have to use these to put the paper out next week. Yeah, we did it!”

Ezard worked for the newspaper until 2004. “The best part of the job was the people,” she said. “We had hard-working people at the news-paper.”

As it is today, something is going on all the time at the newspaper. “The Courier was a good place to work,” she said.

HEADLINES FROM THE PASTBy Kathy [emailprotected]

Ute Trail StampedeJuly 23, 1964: The rodeo made the front

page of the first Courier, as it did in many issues after that. The first issue was geared toward promoting the three day event.Street Signs

June 10, 1965: That was before the city thought about paving streets. The proposal was for the small green and white street signs that still mark the roadways.Memorial Library

Jan. 20, 1966: The first step toward gain-ing a library in the area. Later the city and county approved two library districts. The area now has five.Florissant Bill

Jan. 25, 1968: This action was the first step to establish the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. The park is celebrat-ing its 20th anniversary this summer.Eric Dickson

June 6, 1968: The reality of war hit home

when Dickson was killed. He was Woodland Park and Teller County’s first Vietnam War casualty.Highway Expansion

September 1971: The State Highway De-partment proposed four lanes for Highway 24 from Cascade west. The issue continued until bids were entered a couple years later.Bond Rejected

Nov. 23, 1971: A bond issue for a new middle school was rejected, one of several rejections the school district faced.7-11 Plans Store

July 6, 1972: The first of several conve-nience stores announced plans to locate in Woodland Park. Brookhart’s also an-nounced a new store in 1972.24 Bypass Question

March 14, 1974: With the widening of Highway 24, the issue of bypassing down-town Woodland Park became a heated is-sue. The question was put on the April elec-tion ballot in 1974 and met defeat by more than three to one.Rampart Reservoir

Aug. 29, 1974: The public recreation area

opened Aug. 31. The reservoir area is one of the most well used recreational facilities in the Teller County area.Stoplight Scheduled

April 22, 1976: The City’s first stoplight was proposed for Highway 24 and Fairview. One year later a study was proposed for a stoplight at the intersection of highways 67 and24.Teller Earthquake

Jan. 11, 1979: An earthquake rated 2.5 to 3.0 on the scale shook homes around the area. Very little damage was reported.Medical Center

May 15, 1980: Plans were made to estab-lish an emergency medical center in Wood-land Park. Langstaff-Brown Medical Center is operated by St. Francis Hospital and re-cently received a clean bill of health after reports of financial losses.New Bank in Town

July 30, 1981: Mountain National Bank announced plans to build in Woodland Park. Jim and Charlie Oaks would go on to run the bank.Resignations

Jan. 31, 1985: Four key city employees left their positions, including city manager Kirk Relford, building inspector Mark Elder, parks and recreation director Sue Elder and public works director Larry Iverson.Bergstrom Dies

March 13, 1986: Bert Bergstrom was a major figure in the development of Wood-land Park and donated nine acres of land for the rodeo grounds.Bond Wins Big

Oct. 9, 1986: Probably the biggest head-line to run on the front page, this one an-nounced a successful bond issue for a new elementary school.Crowd Opposes Center

Dec. 19, 1987: Hundreds of residents and merchants packed Woodland Park City Hall to protest granting public funds to lure new businesses, specifically a shopping center with a Wal-Mart store. The issue ended up on the city election ballot and in a contro-versial court battle.

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Pikes Peak Courier 25 May 13, 2015

25-Special

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HEADLINES FROM THE PASTJan. 31, 1985: Four key city employees

left their positions, including city manager Kirk Relford, building inspector Mark Elder, parks and recreation director Sue Elder and public works director Larry Iverson.Bergstrom Dies

March 13, 1986: Bert Bergstrom was a major figure in the development of Wood-land Park and donated nine acres of land for the rodeo grounds.Bond Wins Big

Oct. 9, 1986: Probably the biggest head-line to run on the front page, this one an-nounced a successful bond issue for a new elementary school.Crowd Opposes Center

Dec. 19, 1987: Hundreds of residents and merchants packed Woodland Park City Hall to protest granting public funds to lure new businesses, specifically a shopping center with a Wal-Mart store. The issue ended up on the city election ballot and in a contro-versial court battle.

50 YEARS AGO

The Church In The Wildwood is pleased to announce that the Rev. J. Paul Tatter has accepted the call to their church. His first Sunday in the pulpit as their minister will be May 16, 1965. The church feels most fortunate in acquiring Tatter.

• • •Leonard Vahscholts was the first place

winner of the Woodland Park and Cripple Creek-Victor High Schools sponsored

ROAD-E-O. This event was the first driving Road-e-o in this region and was held at the Woodland Park Saddle Club grounds.

• • •Woodland Park opened its first apart-

ment house this week and it has a beauti-ful view of Pikes Peak. The name of the building is “The Howff,” which is Scottish for “resort.”

• • •

The Junior-Senior Prom and Banquet was held May 7 at the Woodland Park High School Auditorium. The theme was “In the Misty Moonlight.” The Fascinations played for dancing.

• • •The Cowhand held its grand opening on

Saturday, May 15th.• • •

Mailing deadlines at the post office in

Woodland Park will be 4:15 p.m. for the new next day delivery service being offered by the U.S. Postal Service. This service covers all post offices in a 75,000 mile area of central and eastern Colorado. Extensive testing has assured the success of this dra-matic new program, which in effect offers “first rate service” for fourth-class mail, according to Postmaster Harbour.

— Compiled by Kathy Fleer

Several �ags have identi�ed the front page of the Pikes Peak Courier throughout the yeas. The biggest design changes were mostly when the paper changed owners. The �rst �ag was design around a horse back rider. Later, mountains were added to the design. This design was used longer than any of the others.

FLAGS THROUGH THE YEARS

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26 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

26-Special

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Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (26)

Pikes Peak Courier 27 May 13, 2015

27

WOODLAND COUNTRY LODGEServing Food 4-8pm Daily

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Haircraft Barber ShopHaircraft Barber Shop“A new barber in town”

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Cadets volunteer for wild� re preparedness Sta� report

U.S. Air Force Academy Cadets joined the Coalition for the Upper South Platte as part of National Wildfi re Com-munity Preparedness Day last week to raise awareness about wildfi re risk and effective wildfi re mitigation.

This volunteer project focused on mitigating important transportation routes in the Palmer Lake area that will be critical for resident evacuation and fi refi ghter personnel in the event of a wildfi re. Efforts to haul, stack, and chip slash during this wildfi re mitigation project will help protect homes, neighborhoods, and communities, while increas-ing safety for wildland fi refi ghters.

As evidenced by recent, devastating wildfi res, high-in-tensity wildfi re continues to pose a major threat in Colo-rado, particularly in the wildland-urban interface.

Proven wildfi re mitigation techniques greatly reduce the risk of wildfi re to lives and property, and improve the health of our forests. Wildfi re is a natural and inevitable part of our environment, so communities must work together to pro-actively prepare for wildfi re. National Wildfi re Preparedness Day is part of a nationwide movement to increase aware-ness about wildfi re and motivate communities to prepare.

About the Coalition for the Upper South PlatteThe Coalition for the Upper South Platte is dedicated to

protecting the water quality and ecological health of the Upper South Platte Watershed, trough the cooperative ef-forts of watershed stakeholders, with emphasis placed on community values and economic sustainability.

The 2,600 square mile Upper South Platte Watershed, located southwest of Denver and stretching from Strontia Springs to the Continental Divide, is a critical water source for the majority of Colorado residents, provides an abun-dance of recreational opportunities, and is home to unique ecosystems and rare species.

Since 1998, CUSP has been working with partners and communities to sustainability manage the Upper South Platte Watershed and connecting watersheds for the ben-efi t of all stakeholders, now and in the future.

Some cadets assisted in noxious weed removal as well. Photos courtesy of Michelle Connelly, CUSP forester

May 2, Palmer Lake residents were assisted by 30 USAFA cadets under the direction of The Coalition for the Upper South Platte in community � re mitiga-tion e� orts.

The community and the cadets logged more than 500 hours planning and implementing projects on private properties, town easem*nts and com-munity property to reduce and remove overly-dense, standing dead, and unhealthy trees and vegetation.

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (27)

28 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

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308 Weaverville Road, Divide, CO

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WP woman initiates boutique for NepalBy Pat [emailprotected]

Feeling isolated in Woodland Park from her loved ones in Nepal, Khandu Lama Joseph is wracked by the photo-graphs from her mother’s village, which was destroyed in the earthquake last month.

“What can I do? My heart is breaking for the children,” she said.

Devoted to promoting education for children in Nepal, Lama Joseph has devised a way to help rebuild the school.

“I’d like to have a boutique sale of items of clothing, jewelry, bags and scarves,” she said.

Because Nepal is a base for human traffickers, especially of children, Lama Joseph feels a sense of urgency. “The chil-dren are easy targets for traffickers,” she said.

Looking at a photograph of a little boy crying for his mother after the earthquake, Lama Joseph is emotional. “I’m compelled to help,” she said. “I can’t just sit here and not do something.”

Founder of Asha Gifts, an online shop that sells products made by villagers such as those in the Helambu area, Lama

Joseph hopes to recreate the theme with the boutique in Woodland Park.

“I want to help my people,” she said. “I’m desperate to get back.”

In addition to collecting items from the community for a sale, for which the date will be announced, Lama Joseph seeks donations online through the Mondo Foundation and the link “Donate Now.”

For now, Lama Joseph has no immediate plans to travel to Nepal. “I am hoping to go at some point; I want to be involved,” she said.

While the world and humanitarian organizations are fo-cused on helping the people in Nepal, Lama Joseph sees an end to the interest. “Once the cameras are gone, they will still need help,” she said. “The suffering will still be there.”

For information about the boutique, call Lama Joseph at 719 354-6438 or 719 343-7818.

Khandu Lama Joseph of Woodland Park has started a fundraiser to rebuild the school in her mother’s village in Nepal. The school is one of hundreds, perhaps thousands, of buildings destroyed in the earthquake last month. Joseph is collecting donations through the Mondo Foundation. Photo by Pat Hill

Lois Sprague displays her oil portraits in the Eichman Gallery at Park State Bank & Trust until June 10. Sprague is pictured with the portrait of her mother, Jean Rosio. Photo by Pat Hill

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Black Hills Energy’s rebates for new, qualified energy-e�cient appliances make them more a�ordable so you can buy them now—and lower your energy costs right away.

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PIKES PEAK REGIONAL MEDICAL CAMPUSWoodland Park

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WP woman initiates boutique for Nepal Joseph hopes to recreate the theme with the boutique in Woodland Park.

“I want to help my people,” she said. “I’m desperate to get back.”

In addition to collecting items from the community for a sale, for which the date will be announced, Lama Joseph seeks donations online through the Mondo Foundation and the link “Donate Now.”

For now, Lama Joseph has no immediate plans to travel to Nepal. “I am hoping to go at some point; I want to be involved,” she said.

While the world and humanitarian organizations are fo-cused on helping the people in Nepal, Lama Joseph sees an end to the interest. “Once the cameras are gone, they will still need help,” she said. “The suffering will still be there.”

For information about the boutique, call Lama Joseph at 719 354-6438 or 719 343-7818.

Business Buzz The Business Buzz features news about the economic

scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at [emailprotected] or 686-6458.

Divide Feed hosts its grand opening June 6.The Roshek Group in Woodland Park has been named

the No. 1 Coldwell Banker Team in Colorado for 2014. The group was also in the Top 10 for the Western Region in terms of total units sold.

The 13 annual Keep Woodland Park Beautiful Spring Cleanup Celebration is Saturday, May 30, at the Ute Pass Cultural Center Pavilion. Registration begins at 9 a.m. There is a free cookout at noon.

Jane Mannon, community affairs manager for the Crip-

ple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co., reviews the mine’s op-

erations, provides an update on construction projects and

an overview of what the community might look forward to

in the near future. The presentation is at 10 a.m. May 16 at

371 E. Bennett Ave. in Cripple Creek.

Lois Sprague displays her oil portraits in the Eichman Gallery at Park State Bank & Trust until June 10. Sprague is pictured with the portrait of her mother, Jean Rosio. Photo by Pat Hill

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Lake George Charter School Administrator Bill Fredenburg acknowledged the contributions made by 135 volunteers at a recognition ceremony held on Apr. 23. Photo by Sonja Oliver

David Buttery, Woodland Park City Manager and Eagle Scout, recently o� ered encouragement and congratulations to Columbine Pack 20 Cub Scouts at the annual cross-over ceremony, when cubs promote into the next scouting rank. Buttery spoke of the lessons he learned in the scouting program that are still bene� cial to him today. Eighteen cub scouts were honored at the ceremony. Courtesy photo

TALKING TO THE RANKS

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Pikes Peak Courier 31 May 13, 2015

31

Nice 3 bed, 2 bath home located in a quiet neighborhood on a large corner lot with mature trees and views. Walking distance to schools, shopping and restaurants. Spacious, open concept is perfect for entertaining. Large working kitchen. Cozy wood fireplace in the living room.Finished lower level with family room, kitchenette, bedroom, bathroom, laundry area and private entrance. Great location!

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Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Sunday School 9:30 AM

(Both Adults & Children)

Worship 10:30 AM Sunday 7:00pM Tuesday

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Nursery Care provided

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Church in the Wildwood

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Adult Sunday School9:00 AM

Worship 10:00 AM

Children’s Sunday SchoolDuring Worship

Nursery CareProvided

684-9427www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave.Green Mountain Falls

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Woodland ParkChurch of Christ

Worship ServiceSunday MorningBible Class 10 am

Worship Service11am

Wednesday BibleClass 7pm

816 Browning Ave. & BurdetteCall: 687-2323 or 687-6311

{ {{ {{ {

Worship ServicesWednesday 7:00 p.m.

Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.Sunday School 9:15 a.m.

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SUNDAY WORSHIPSERVICES

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27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park(2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

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SERVICE TIMESSunday Service – 12 pm

Wednesday Night Bible Study 7pm

Highland Bible ChurchMeeting at Tamarac Center

331-4903Sunday School – 8:50 am

Worship – 10:00 amwww.highlandbiblechurch.org

Mountain ViewUnited Methodist

Church1101 Rampart Range Rd.

Woodland Park719 687-3868

Sunday Worship~10:30 amAdult classes~9:00 am

Children classes~10:30 am(dismissed from worship)Youth~Sunday 4:30 pmwww.mt-viewumc.org

Please join us in worshipping our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ,

on Sunday, at the

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saintslocated at 785 Apache Trail, Woodland Park, Colorado

at 10 a.m.Phone – (719) 472-4609

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Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church 220 S. West St.

Woodland Park • 719.687.9345

Saturday Vigil Mass 4:30pm Sunday Mass 9am

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Worship That Transforms!Sundays @ 10:30 a.m.

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Lake George Charter acknowledges 135 volunteers, 4,431 hours By Sonja Oliver Contributing writer

Lake George Charter is a small, rural elementary school with a current student population of 119 children, which is why the community volunteer participa-tion is remarkable.

School Administrator Bill Fredenburg addressed volun-teer’s accomplishments at a Vol-unteer Recognition reception held on Thursday, Apr. 23 saying that volunteers “make a world of difference” and, quoting James Allen ‘No duty is more urgent than that of returning thanks.’

Fredenburg cited some in-credible statistics: 135 volun-teers, 4,431 volunteers hours and a four-to-one volunteer to student ratio. Fifty of the 135 vol-unteers are not parents but com-munity members who see the importance of investing in the future generation.

“Many are retired community members without direct ties to the school who share their re-sources and knowledge with us,” Fredenburg said.

Fredenburg said volunteers help the school to expand its im-pact on children’s education in areas such as: tutoring for math

and reading, sports activities, arts in education, science and cul-tural programs, security, as well as fundraising efforts by Lion’s Pride.

Fredenburg also cited another quote of which the author is un-known: “‘If you want to touch the future, touch (the life) of a child.’”

Lake George Charter School Administrator Bill Fredenburg acknowledged the contributions made by 135 volunteers at a recognition ceremony held on Apr. 23. Photo by Sonja Oliver

Lake George Library meets author Kathy Brandt Sta� report

Lake George Library had a “Meet the Author” event Sat-urday, May 9, at 3 pm. Kathy Brandt talked about her new book Walks on the Margins: A Story of Bipolar Illness.

Stop by the front offi ce any time next week to register your child for the 2015-16 school year. We are taking new registrations too if you know someone interested in our school, send them by too.

Youth Dental Day is Wednesday, May 13. There is still room for more families. See Julie if you need a new form and don’t forget you have to call to set up an appointment.

Spring Program is next Thursday, May 14, with perfor-mances at 2:30 p.m. (good for those who cannot make the evening show) and at 6:30 p.m.. Everyone in the commu-nity is invited to attend.

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32 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

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Western spruce budworm damages as destructive defoliatorPest prevalent in Teller Countylast few yearsBy Mark J. PlattenColorado State University Extension Director for Teller County

The western spruce budworm (WSBW), Choristo-neura occidentalis Freeman, is the most widely distrib-uted and destructive forest defoliator in western North America.

An outbreak has been prevalent throughout Teller County over the past three-to-four years and is likely to continue into 2015. Their primary host is the Douglas-fir, although they will also be found on white fir, Engelmann spruce, blue spruce, and subalpine fir.

The budworm larvae emerge from their hibernacula in early May through late June and begin feeding on old nee-dles until the new buds emerge, hence their name. They emerge as tiny larvae, approximately 1/8-1/4 inch, with yellow-green bodies and a brown head.

As the new needles continue to lengthen, the rapidly de-veloping larvae continue to feed. It is during this phase that most of the damage occurs when they loosely web the new foliage together, feeding in relative protection from preda-tors.

You may not even notice them until they drop, or hang, from the affected trees, attached by what appears to be spi-der-like thread. They go through six stages of growth with the final larvae between 1-1.25 inches in length, with tan or light-brown heads, and brownish-olive bodies.

Each mature body segment has two conspicuous pairs of white spots.

This process of growth takes approximately 40 days, at which time the larvae pupates and the adult moths emerge 7-10 days later.

Some of the first moths identified last year emerged from several Douglas-fir trees along the Lovell Gulch trail on July 15, 2014.

After mating, the females lay masses of overlapping, green eggs on the undersides of host tree needles. The young larvae hatch in approximately 10 days and move to crevices under bark scales, or lichen, where they spin silken hibernacula and overwinter. This completes their cycle, with one generation per year.

The greatest impact to mature trees is reduced growth because the new needles photosynthesize more efficiently than mature needles. Multiple years of defoliation can lead to branch tip loss, top death, and even tree mortality.

Saplings and young stands directly beneath the mature host trees are especially affected as the larvae disperse from above, significantly reducing growth, killing tree tops, and potentially leading to mortality.

Even if the WSBW doesn’t kill your trees, the injury and stress will make your trees more succeptible to secondary infestations of Douglas-fir beetles and other insects/dis-eases, which may lead to the death of your trees.

Control:In most years, the natural predation via arachnids, para-

sites, climate, and birds will keep them in check. Adverse weather conditions, especially sudden freezes toward the end of May when the larvae have just emerged, could kill a significant portion of the larvae. Unfortunately, with our relatively mild winters over the past decade, this may not be likely. With three plus years of fairly heavy outbreaks in Teller County, you may want to consider other measures.

Cultural practices such as thinning, watering, and fertil-izing enhance tree vigor, which may help them withstand repeated attacks. Chemical control is often used to protect high-value trees, much the same way as we protect against mountain pine beetles.

For more information on chemical use, please see Wash-ington State University Extension’s Forest Health Note: http://ext.nrs.wsu.edu/forestryext/foresthealth/notes/westernbudworm.htm One successful control agent is a naturally-occurring bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis, or B.t.

It is specific to larvae without having any adverse effects on the environment. See the CSU Extension Fact Sheet http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05556.html for more information on B.t.

It is often cost prohibitive to spray your entire property, especially if you have large parcels of land; although, there are several subdivisions in the county and adjoining ar-eas that have conducted aerial spraying, generally ranging around $55 per acre.

If you are interested in aerial spraying, contact Mike Till, a forester with the Colorado State Forest Service office in Woodland Park at 719-687-2921.

He will put your name on a list since the sprayer requires a minimum of 450 acres for treatment.

Even with aerial spraying, only the top of the canopy is covered. Between spraying and predation, hopefully the outbreak can be put in check and most of the trees saved.

The best time to spray is the two-to-three weeks follow-ing bud break, generally occurring early, to mid, June.

For a list of forest contractors who may be qualified to spray your individual trees, please contact the Colorado State Forest Service.

Mark J. Platten is the Colorado State University Exten-sion Director for Teller County. Extension’s focus is bring-ing the research-based information from the university to the community. Some programs include Colorado Master Gardeners, 4-H, Native Plant Masters, Agriculture, and Natural Resources. Mark can be reached at 686-7961 or emailed at [emailprotected]

Budworm Moth Dead tip.

Pupal casing. Mature larvae.

Webbed tips. Juvenile larvae.

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (32)

Pikes Peak Courier 33 May 13, 2015

33

Graduation

Marie Martinez, 2002 graduate of WPHS is a spring 2015 graduate from Univer-sity of Colorado - Denver with a Masters degree in Business Administration. Martinez, raised in Wood-land Park, attended Wood-land Park schools from K-12 (Columbine Elementary). Marie is a 2006 CU-Boulder graduate and studied abroad in China and Mexico. She was a 2002 Colorado Ambas-sador of Music, performing in seven countries across Europe. Marie was Miss Rocky Mountain at the 2004 Miss Colorado Pageant.

Marie is the daughter of Dean and Tammy Martinez. Family includes brother, Mike; sister, Catherine and niece, Aaliyah. Marie is the great-granddaughter of the late Clyde and Mildred Mor-gan, Green Mountain Falls, CO., long-time Ute Pass residents, who opened Vista Verde Rock Shop in 1964. Marie lives in Austin, TX.

801 West Cucharras St., Co. Springs, CO

475-7003, Fax: 447-1761Email: [emailprotected]

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Your pets can play all day in a safe, fully supervised environment, where you can observe them on webcam!

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Equine doctors with advanced training

Doggie Day Care

Emergency Services

Full Service Equine Hospital

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Visit our

NEWMEET OUR DOCTORS

Dr. Brittany FactorDr. Michael FactorDr. Brady Thompson

15226 W Hwy 24 Woodland Park 1/2 mile West of Pikes Peak Regional Hospital

The only AAHA Accredited Hospital in Teller County

719-687-9201

Panthers � nish baseball season 8-10 Woodland Park unable to get last game in due to inclement weather

By Danny Summers [emailprotected]

Woodland Park’s baseball season ended early due to the forces of Mother Nature. The Panthers’ fi nal game against Harrison, scheduled for May 5, was postponed and then cancelled as snow, rain, hail and wind wreaked havoc on all sports last week.

Woodland Park fi nished its season with an 8-10 record.

Interestingly, the make-up game against Har-rison was a rescheduled game from earlier in the

season when that game was snowed out. The Harrison game was supposed to be Woodland Park’s day to honor its seniors.

“Harrison told us they would only play on (May 5),” said Woodland Park coach Cliff Rich-ardson. “We tried to schedule another team, but it didn’t work out. The only window we had would have been Thursday (May 7), but even then our fi eld was still pretty damp.”

Instead of a ball game to honor his seniors, Richardson took the team to AJ’s Pizza.

“It sort of had that Little League feel to it,” Richardson said with a smile. “We didn’t have the fl owers and all that stuff, but we had a great time.”

The Panthers’ seven seniors are Anthony Woods, Justin Logsdon, Nash Grayckowski, Da-kota Herman, Logan Herberger, Brandon Alex-

ander, Sean DeRamus.Barring any move-outs or transfers, Wood-

land Park should return eight players who either started or saw signifi cant playing time this sea-son. The list consists of junior catcher Zach Allen (.372 batting average, 11 RBIs), junior pitcher/outfi elder Jason Kekich (.315, 12 RBIs), junior outfi elder Zack Hess (.389, 5 extra base hits), ju-nior third baseman/pitcher Jake Jansma (.281), junior utility player Tyler Bates (.391), sopho-more second baseman Sam Levy (.421), sopho-more utility player Cole Trichell (.292) and soph-omore outfi elder Conner Elliott (.267).

Woodland Park will play a freelance summer league schedule. Del Garrick, the school’s prin-cipal and former baseball coach, will coach the varsity, while Richardson works with the incom-ing freshmen and next year’s sophom*ores.

Woodland Park’s Nash Grayckowski batted .349 this season. Photos by Paul Magnuson

Woodland Park junior Zach Allen batted .372 this season with four doubles and 11 RBIs.

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (33)

34 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

34-Sports

Three more Woodland Park student athletes ink college dealsKatelyn Kemp, Tommy Hanco*ck and Halle Brimm were honored during May 4 ceremonyBy Danny [emailprotected]

Woodland Park High School student athletes Katelyn Kemp, Tommy Hanco*ck and Halle Brimm were honored during a ceremony in the school’s gymnasium on May 4 as they signed their national letters of intent.

Kemp, a basketball player who will attend Lamar Community College, was second on the Panthers in scoring last season with 11.5 points per game and helped Woodland Park to a 10-13 record. The victory to-tal was the most in the history of the program.

“I just visited (Lamar) not too long ago,” Kemp said. “I went to Otero and had a little tryout. It came down to deciding and I really liked Lamar. It’s a nice campus.”

Kemp began her high school career at Fountain-Fort Carson. She transferred to Woodland Park prior to her junior year and was a two-year varsity starter.

The 5-foot-11 Kemp joins a Lamar team that was sec-ond in the nation in scoring last season among all junior college teams with nearly 100 points per game. Runnin’ Lopes coach Tom Sutherland was on hand for the cer-emony along with two of his players; one of which was former Coronado star Taryn Frazier, who averaged 15 points and 11 rebounds for Coronado as a senior.

“They rotate in and out every 30 seconds,” said Kemp, who plans to major in special education. “It’s a very fast pace. A lot of threes. It’s a really quick rotation so I’ll be seeing a lot of minutes. It will be a lot of fun.”

Kemp is president of Woodland Park’s chapter of Best Buddies, a program for special education students that attend the high school.

Kemp’s Woodland Park coach this past season was her mother, Kris.

“She just wanted to study and play ball; it really didn’t matter where,” Kris said. “At one time she said `I want to play for Baylor.’ But when it came down to it she just wanted to be play ball somewhere and have it be a good fit.”

Kris Kemp has two more daughters - Abby and Nikki - that will be involved in the Woodland Park program next season.

Hanco*ck, a four-year member of the school’s varsi-ty wrestling team, will be headed Division II Colorado State University-Pueblo where he is a preferred walk-on. If he makes the team he will go on scholarship.

He decided on CSU-Pueblo over the weekend. He trains with the United States Army World Class Athlete program based at Fort Carson.

“I’m in a lot of pain right now,” Hanco*ck said with a smile. “My ear is swelled up, my elbow is hyper-extend-ed, my tendon is damaged, my nerves are destroyed, and my back is just all messed up right now. And my knee is messed up.”

Hanco*ck, a two-time qualifier for the state wrestling tournament who was seeded fourth at 120 pounds as a senior, is excited to be training with the older wrestlers

at Fort Carson.“I’m picking up a lot of skill and techniques,” Han-

co*ck said. “They’re beating the crap out of me right now, but it’s making me better.”

Hanco*ck, who posted a 42-7 record as a senior, in-cluding a first-round victory at state, considered Mar-ion Military Institute in Alabama, University of North-ern Colorado and Kansas Northwest Technical College in Goodland.

Woodland Park wrestling coach Keith Sieracki praised Hanco*ck for his tremendous work ethic.

“When most of the other kids decide they want to go home and do something else other than wrestle on the weekends, Tommy is willing to do the extra,” said Sier-acki, who wrestled for the Army World Class program, for nearly two decades. “He’s willing to go to the tour-naments 150 miles away where there are only six kids in his weight class. All that extra stuff is what gets you over the hump, and whatever I tell him to do he does it.

“I always say if you listen and work hard you will be successful. He does all the above.”

Brimm was a member of Woodland Park’s cheer team and will be taking her talents to Colorado State Univer-sity in Fort Collins. Brimm won the Golden Megaphone Award given out annually by Woodland Park coach Al-lison Weismann.

“After just a year of cheerleading for us she took on that leadership role,” Weismann said. “She came to us with a lot of dancing experience. Those skills, along with her hard work and dedication, allowed her to grow as a cheerleader.”

Woodland Park senior Katelyn Kemp, far left, is all smiles as she is about to sign her national letter of intent to play basketball for Lamar Community College. Kemp joined Tommy Hanco*ck, center, and Halle Brimm during a signing party in the Woodland Park High School gymnasium on May 4. Hanco*ck will wrestle for Colorado State University-Pueblo and Brimm will cheer for CSU in Fort Collins. Photo by Danny Summers

HAVE A STORY IDEA?Email Publisher and Editor Rob Carrigan at [emailprotected] or call 719-687-3006.

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (34)

Pikes Peak Courier 35 May 13, 2015

35

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Erickson aiming for gold at state track meetWoodland Park senior Hayden Erickson is the favorite to win the Class 4A state shot put title this weekendBy Danny [emailprotected]

At 6-foot-5, 280 pounds, Hayden Erickson stands out in most crowds. The Woodland Park High School senior hopes he stands out as the top shot put thrower when the best athletes gather this weekend for the state track and field meet.

“Now that I have more of my technique down it’s taken a little bit of weight off my shoulders knowing I can throw even farther than I have been,” Erickson said. “It feels re-ally good to be up there in first place. I know that people are close to me, but it feels good to know that I can beat them if I have good throws.”

Erickson is first in all of Class 4A in the shot put with a throw of 53 feet, 1.5 inches recorded at the Pueblo Twilight on May 1. Pueblo Central’s Beau Gordon is second (51-7). Erickson has been leading the pack most of the season.

Erickson is ranked fourth in the state among all clas-sifications. Mountain Range’s (5A) is first at 54-2.

Erickson is ranked fifth in the discus. He had his best throw of 153-1 at the Cougar Classic on April 24 at Garry Berry Stadium. He is 11 feet back of Canon City’s Austin Bryan, who is first at 164-11.

This is Erickson’s third trip to the state tournament, which takes place May 14-16 at Jefferson County Stadium in Lakewood. He placed ninth as a junior, one spot be-hind teammate Randy Westfall. Erickson did not place as a sophom*ore. He narrowly missed qualifying for state as a freshman.

“I’ve put in a lot of practice, getting in the weight room every day,” said Erickson, whose best shot put throw as a junior was 50-6. “I’m getting stronger and working hard.

“Throwing the shot is a lot of technique and strength. A lot of the strength comes from the legs and upper body. If you’re just throwing with your upper body it’s not going to go very far. You have to get your whole body into it.”

Depending how you look at it, Erickson either trains at the ideal practice facility or the oddest. The Panthers’ throwers work out on the old asphalt tennis court in the front of the school while the rest of the track team is sever-al hundreds of yards away on the other side of the school. When the weather conditions are poor, the athletes train indoors in the school’s gymnasiums or hallways.

Woodland Park throws coach Brett Nelson has worked with Erickson the last two seasons.

“Hayden has pretty much dedicated himself to working

year-round,” Nelson said. “He went to a (throws) camp in

Washington over the summer and then when school start-

ed he was in the weight room lifting all the time, and then

one day a week he and I were throwing outside at 6:30 in

the morning. We threw every week just to keep his tech-

nique down. It’s starting to pay off now.”

Erickson has a younger brother, Hamilton, who is an

equally imposing figure and just a freshman. He is also a

thrower, already surpassing 37 feet.

Woodland Park senior Hayden Erickson shows o� his tools of his trade – a shot put and discus – that he will be using at this weekend’s state track and �eld championships at Je�erson County Stadium in Lakewood. Erickson is ranked �rst in all of Class 4A in the shot put and fourth in the discus. Photo by Danny Sum-mers

Three more Woodland Park student athletes ink college dealsat Fort Carson.

“I’m picking up a lot of skill and techniques,” Han-co*ck said. “They’re beating the crap out of me right now, but it’s making me better.”

Hanco*ck, who posted a 42-7 record as a senior, in-cluding a first-round victory at state, considered Mar-ion Military Institute in Alabama, University of North-ern Colorado and Kansas Northwest Technical College in Goodland.

Woodland Park wrestling coach Keith Sieracki praised Hanco*ck for his tremendous work ethic.

“When most of the other kids decide they want to go home and do something else other than wrestle on the weekends, Tommy is willing to do the extra,” said Sier-acki, who wrestled for the Army World Class program, for nearly two decades. “He’s willing to go to the tour-naments 150 miles away where there are only six kids in his weight class. All that extra stuff is what gets you over the hump, and whatever I tell him to do he does it.

“I always say if you listen and work hard you will be successful. He does all the above.”

Brimm was a member of Woodland Park’s cheer team and will be taking her talents to Colorado State Univer-sity in Fort Collins. Brimm won the Golden Megaphone Award given out annually by Woodland Park coach Al-lison Weismann.

“After just a year of cheerleading for us she took on that leadership role,” Weismann said. “She came to us with a lot of dancing experience. Those skills, along with her hard work and dedication, allowed her to grow as a cheerleader.”

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (35)

36 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

36

Advertise: 303-566-4100

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Offi ce Rent/Lease

FOR RENT Available June 1, 2015

1 YEAR LEASECorner of Midland and Boundary, Woodland Park

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CNA'sCripple Creek Care Center, TellerCounty's only Long-Term CareNursing facility is looking for Certi-fied Nurse Aides. We offer a com-p e t i t i v e s t a r t i n g s a l a r y o f$12.00/hour and pay 95% of em-ployee health and dental insurancepremiums . Drug and TB screen,background check, and pre-em-ployment physical are required.Please submit applications in per-son at 700 N "A" Street in CrippleCreek. Call with questions and/ordriving directions 719.689.2931.CCCC is an Equal Opportunity Em-ployer.

Double Eagle is Accepting Applications for the Following OpenImmediate Positions Available:Room Attendant,

Houseman, Porter, Night Cleaner,Host/Hostess, Waitstaff, Busser,Grill Clerk, Prep Cook, Line Cook,Dishwasher. These Positions Re-quire A Valid Gaming License:Group Sales Rep*, Dealers: Black-jack & Roulette*, Pit Boss*, VIPHost/Hostess*, Cashier*. Pick-Upan Application at Double EagleHotel and Casino-442 E BennettAve Cripple Creek, CO 80813 orD o w n l o a d A p p l i c a t i o n a twww.decasino.com or Fax Applica-tion and Resume to 719-689-5057.Details will be discussed at time ofInterview.

Elem. Teacher: Lake GeorgeCharter School is seeking

applications for a teacher forgrades 5-6. Visit our websitewww.lakegeorgecharterschool.orgor call for application:

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Full Time Window Cleaning/General Cleaning Crew MemberWill Train, need detail oriented,

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Background Check & Drug TestingTo apply call 719-689-0926

Immediate openings forHomemakers/PCP serving theTeller County. No experiencenecessary, we train!$9.00/hour + mileage. We haveFT (with benefits) orPT with flexible hours.Residents of Teller and easternPark County only to apply.To apply: www.prospecthch.org

Laborer-Operator $27,164-$36,751yr., DOE Full-time, full benefits.Cripple Creek Public Works

Department. Full job ad and applic-ation at www.cripplecreekgov.com

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Night Custodian needed at Woodland Park School Distrit Re-2.High school diploma or equivalent.Physical ability to perform job

responsibilities. Physical and fingerprinting required. 8 hoursdaily - Monday through Friday.$9.51/hr. (90 day trial period)/$9.91/hr. Complete On-Line

Application Packet:http://www.wpsdk12.org or call

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Lake George Pizza Now acceptingapplications for Line Cooks/

Dishwashers Full time & Part time Apply in person at Lake GeorgePizza, 37875 U.S. Highway 24

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PART TIME Council CoordinatorSelf-motivated, detail-oriented

individual for providing coordination among affiliates of theTeller/Park Early Childhood

Council. Duties include: Developand sustain a multi-county

partnership through building strongcommunity relationships; Grantwriting and budget management;Oversight of community needs

assessment; Coordination and implementation of strategic planning process. 30 hours/wk @$20hr. Bachelors degree preferredalong with experience in grant

writing or early childhood health,mental health, care and education,and/or family support and services.Some regional travel required.Email resume with cover letter toNicol Randolph:

[emailprotected] website: www.tellerparkecc.org

Salaried Camp Host Needed-Primitive sites, no electric fromMay- September in Lower SouthPlatte. Please call Ronnie for in-formation 303-647-2250

Salaried Camp Host Needed-Primitive sites, no electric from

May- September in LowerSouth Platte.

Please call Ronniefor information303-647-2250

Help Wanted

Speech Therapist: Lake GeorgeCharter School is seeking applica-tions for a part-time Speech Ther-apist for 15-16 school yr. Visit ourwebsite www.lakegeorgecharter-school.org or call for application:719-748-3911. Fax resume to: 719-748-8151. Closes 5-28-15 EOE

Teller County seeks a SocialCaseworker III-Intake for the De-partment of Social Services. Start-ing salary: $3,347 per month plus acomplete benefit package. Applica-tions and job description availableat www.co.teller.co.us or the TellerCounty Human Resources Office at112 North A Street, Cripple Creek,CO. Completed application plus re-sume and cover letter due by 12:00pm, Monday, May 18, 2015 at theabove address. EOE

Teller County seeks an Administrative Assistant II for theDepartment of Social Services.Starting Salary: $2,067 per monthplus a complete benefit package.Applications available at the TellerCounty Human Resources Office,112 North A Street, Cripple Creek,CO or at www.co.teller.co.us .Completed application plus re-sume and cover letter due by

12:00 noon, Monday, May 18, 2015at the above address. EOE

Theater Assistant – Part-Time-Seasonal-No Benefits-ButteTheatre in Cripple Creek, starting$10.23/hr, DOE. 18-22 hours aweek. Must be 18 years of age orolder. No experience required.

Application and full job ad atwww.cripplecreekgov.com.

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NOW HIRINGSCHOOL BUS DRIVERS

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Apply online at:www.durhamschoolservices.com

Or apply in person at:877 Research Dr., Woodland

Park, CO 80863Call: 1-719-687-4411

Must be 21Have a valid driver's license.

Durham conducts pre-employmentdrug screening, criminal back-

ground checks,and motor vehicle record.

Volunteer Recruitment Coord,PT/20/hrs./wk. Req’d: HS grad orequiv., proficient in MS Ofc prgms,2+ yrs volunteer mgmt exp., excel.people and org. skills, & exp.work’g in inclusive & diverse orgs.Prefer’d: College grad, publicspeaking, & bilingual Spanish.Mail/fax resume & COVER LTR by5/20/15 to: CASA, HR, 701 S.

Cascade, C/S CO 80903 or fax667-1818. EOE

FARM & AGRICULTURE

Farm Products & Produce

Grain Finished Buffaloquartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

Garage Sales

912 Lorraine Ave, Woodland ParkSat & Sun (5/16 - 5/17) 9am-7pmNO EARLY BIRDS

50" Samsung TV LED 1080p $399,Reclining Couch, Dresser Set w/Mirror, Collectables/Nick-Nacks,90's Batman Action Figures etc.

Elephants, Pictures and MORE! indoors if bad weather

Multi FamilyCamper Jacks, Engine Hoist, One

mans trash is another mans?Baked Goods Available

Friday & Saturday May 15 & 168:30am-3:30pm

Triple B Road & Highway 67 NorthFollow Signs

Moving SaleFurniture, Tools, Household,

Lamps, Plants, Piano, much more2015 Crest Court, Woodland Park

5/16 & 5/17 8am-3pm

May 15th & 16th8am-3pm

29 Ridge Point Circle 80814Various house itemsRiding Mower, Fridge

See Divide Garage Saleon Craigs List for details

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Exercise Equipment

Weider Pro home weight exercise system w/rubber floor mat. Like new condition. $200(719)686-1230

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Dry Split Pine $140Green Split Pine $125Full Cords Delivered

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Quality/Dry/Burns CleanCall KC Wood Products

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20.6 cubic foot upright freezer $150Giant brand 26" ladies bicycle $50

Thule 4 bike rack $75Bernina Surger 2500 DCE $450

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PETS

Cats

Give away loving Kittyneeds someone who is home a lot

Moving (719)233-2430

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LOST PUPPY-REWARD-11wkmale brindle mastiff mix-Missing

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Please help!Call 501-628-4767 Day or Night

REAL ESTATE

Land

PIKES PEAK VIEWS!Gt lot w/gar & carport; 2 Ac; well &

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1 Room Cabin inDivide Colorado

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Office Space for Rent in Divide: 250sq. ft. office with separate entrance.$500.00 per month with utilities in-cluded. 1 year lease. Please call719-686-7738 for details.

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Due to illness I have a1985 Beachcraft inboard 23' ski

boat for sale or traderecently serviced, all equipment in-

cluded, new tires on trailer719-660-0719

SERVICES

Cleaning

Clean Organize and Beyondlicensed bonded and insured

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Great ReferencesDarlene 719-375-0183

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CALL 748-3246719-464-6666

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Accurate Rain GuttersSupply 5" Seamless Rain Gutters

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HOME REPAIRSmall repairs to

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References

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WE HAULNeed A Dumpster?

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Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (36)

Pikes Peak Courier 37 May 13, 2015

37

NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesTo advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Public NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic NoticesPublic Notices

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0063

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

On December 9, 2014, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.Original Grantor(s): KURT W STEPHENSOriginal Beneficiary(ies): CANON NATIONAL BANKCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONDate of Deed of Trust: 6/30/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 7/13/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 627989 Original Principal Amount: $157,142.00Outstanding Principal Balance: $157,096.51

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH.

which has the address of: 10363 County Road 11 Florissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and De-mand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of June 24, 2015, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebted-ness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SER-VICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLO-RADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLO-SURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer Financial Protection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/29/2015 Last Publication: 5/27/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 4/15/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOAN OLSON Attorney Registration #28078MCCARTHY & HOLTHUS, LLP 7700 E ARAPAHOE ROAD, SUITE 150, CENTENNIAL, COLORADO 80112Phone: (877) 369-6122Fax: (866) 894-7369Attorney file #: CO-14-629002-JS

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempt-ing to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose.

Legal Notice No. 2014-0063First Publication: 4/29/2015 Last Publication: 5/27/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

Public Trustees Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0006

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 10, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): CHESTER L HOS-KINDS AND PAMELA G POWELLOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR HOME-STAR LENDINGCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 3/17/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust :3/24/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.578065Original Principal Amount: $116,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 9 9 , 6 7 1 . 7 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 2026, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES NO. 12, CORRECTION PLAT,COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COL-ORADO.

which has the address of:2628 Southpark RdFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/12/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005244

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0006First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0006

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 10, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): CHESTER L HOS-KINDS AND PAMELA G POWELLOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR HOME-STAR LENDINGCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:GREEN TREE SERVICING LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 3/17/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust:3/24/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.578065Original Principal Amount: $116,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 9 9 , 6 7 1 . 7 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 2026, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES NO. 12, CORRECTION PLAT,COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COL-ORADO.

which has the address of:2628 Southpark RdFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/12/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005244

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0006First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0062

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On February 26, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.Original Grantor(s): JAMES K SHAFFOROriginal Beneficiary(ies):ENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: ENTFEDERAL CREDIT UNIONDate of Deed of Trust: 1/13/2012Recording Date of Deed of Trust:1/20/2012Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.649995Original Principal Amount: $143,119.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 3 7 , 0 7 6 . 8 6

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 11, BLOCK 3, SPRING VALLEYFILING NO. 8, COUNTY OF TELLER,STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:702 Valley RoadDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/3/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHT Attor-ney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005089

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0062First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2014-0062

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On February 26, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.Original Grantor(s): JAMES K SHAFFOROriginal Beneficiary(ies):ENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: ENTFEDERAL CREDIT UNIONDate of Deed of Trust: 1/13/2012Recording Date of Deed of Trust:1/20/2012Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.649995Original Principal Amount: $143,119.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 3 7 , 0 7 6 . 8 6

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.LOT 11, BLOCK 3, SPRING VALLEYFILING NO. 8, COUNTY OF TELLER,STATE OF COLORADO

which has the address of:702 Valley RoadDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/3/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHT Attor-ney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005089

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2014-0062First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0014

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On February 26, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): JASON LEWELLENAND HANNAH LEWELLENOriginal Beneficiary(ies): ENT FEDERALCREDIT UNIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:ENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONDate of Deed of Trust: 5/15/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust:6/17/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.627413Original Principal Amount: $92,297.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 8 4 , 5 7 7 . 2 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LANDSITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF TELLER,STATE OF COLORADO, BEINGKNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 5,BLOCK 3, ARABIAN ACRES, SECONDFILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATEOF COLORADO.

which has the address of:44 Silver TrailDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/2/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400 ,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 15-006648

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2015-0014First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0014

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On February 26, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): JASON LEWELLENAND HANNAH LEWELLENOriginal Beneficiary(ies): ENT FEDERALCREDIT UNIONCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:ENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONDate of Deed of Trust: 5/15/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust:6/17/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.627413Original Principal Amount: $92,297.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 8 4 , 5 7 7 . 2 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LANDSITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF TELLER,STATE OF COLORADO, BEINGKNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 5,BLOCK 3, ARABIAN ACRES, SECONDFILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATEOF COLORADO.

which has the address of:44 Silver TrailDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/2/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400 ,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 15-006648

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.: 2015-0014First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0015

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On March 12, 2015, the undersigned Pub-lic Trustee caused the Notice of Electionand Demand relating to the Deed of Trustdescribed below to be recorded in theCounty of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s):JOSEPH E. CALLAHAN JR.,AND RENEE M. CALLAHANOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOM-INEE FOR LENDER, AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: THEBANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUST-EE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKEDCERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AB5Date of Deed of Trust: 11/10/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust :11/18/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.587680Original Principal Amount: $160,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 7 8 , 0 1 0 . 1 2

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A'AND INCORPORATED HEREIN ASTHOUGH FULLY SET FORTH.

which has the address of:95 Knighthood LaneDivide, CO 80814-9549

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/16/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKE-WOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: (303) 223-7932Attorney file #: 15-943-28229

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

EXHIBIT FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTIONTrustee’s Sale No. 2015-0015LOTS 29 AND 30, NOW KNOWN AS LOT29A, BLOCK THIRTY NINE, SHER-WOOD FOREST ESTATES UNIT 5,COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COL-ORADO.*****AND MODIFIED BY LOAN MODIFICA-TION AGREEMENT DATED 1-1-2012.***LEGAL DESCRIPTION HAS BEENCORRECTED BY SCRIVENER'S AFFI-DAVIT RECORDED 10/3/08 AT RECEP-TION NO. 621335 IN THE RECORDS OFTELLER COUNTY.

Legal Notice No.: 2015-0015First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0015

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the followingdescribed Deed of Trust:

On March 12, 2015, the undersigned Pub-lic Trustee caused the Notice of Electionand Demand relating to the Deed of Trustdescribed below to be recorded in theCounty of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s):JOSEPH E. CALLAHAN JR.,AND RENEE M. CALLAHANOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOM-INEE FOR LENDER, AMERICA'SWHOLESALE LENDERCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: THEBANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUST-EE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSOF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKEDCERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AB5Date of Deed of Trust: 11/10/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust:11/18/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.587680Original Principal Amount: $160,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 7 8 , 0 1 0 . 1 2

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A'AND INCORPORATED HEREIN ASTHOUGH FULLY SET FORTH.

which has the address of:95 Knighthood LaneDivide, CO 80814-9549

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJuly 1, 2015, at the Teller County PublicTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 3/16/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKE-WOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: (303) 223-7932Attorney file #: 15-943-28229

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

EXHIBIT FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTIONTrustee’s Sale No. 2015-0015LOTS 29 AND 30, NOW KNOWN AS LOT29A, BLOCK THIRTY NINE, SHER-WOOD FOREST ESTATES UNIT 5,COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COL-ORADO.*****AND MODIFIED BY LOAN MODIFICA-TION AGREEMENT DATED 1-1-2012.***LEGAL DESCRIPTION HAS BEENCORRECTED BY SCRIVENER'S AFFI-DAVIT RECORDED 10/3/08 AT RECEP-TION NO. 621335 IN THE RECORDS OFTELLER COUNTY.

Legal Notice No.: 2015-0015First Publication: 5/6/2015Last Publication: 6/3/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0007

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 10, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): RICHARD AZARRELLAOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORT-GAGE SOLUTIONS OF COLORADO,LLCCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:WELLS FARGO BANK, NADate of Deed of Trust: 9/24/2004Recording Date of Deed of Trust :10/4/2004Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.572090Original Principal Amount: $63,995.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 4 8 , 7 5 3 . 9 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

THE SURFACE ONLY OF LOTS 12 AND13 AND THE EAST 90 FEET OF LOT 9,BLOCK 2, HARTFORD ADDITION TOTHE CITY OF VICTOR, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:507 Granite AvenueVictor, CO 80860

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/12/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005888

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0007First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0007

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 10, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): RICHARD AZARRELLAOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORT-GAGE SOLUTIONS OF COLORADO,LLCCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt:WELLS FARGO BANK, NADate of Deed of Trust: 9/24/2004Recording Date of Deed of Trust:10/4/2004Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.572090Original Principal Amount: $63,995.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 4 8 , 7 5 3 . 9 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

THE SURFACE ONLY OF LOTS 12 AND13 AND THE EAST 90 FEET OF LOT 9,BLOCK 2, HARTFORD ADDITION TOTHE CITY OF VICTOR, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:507 Granite AvenueVictor, CO 80860

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/12/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: COURTNEY E WRIGHTAttorney Registration #45482JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-005888

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0007First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0010

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 19, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): YVETTE M. DOWN-ING AND JAMES P. DOWNINGOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOM-INEE FOR LENDER, WR STARKEYMORTGAGE, L.L.P.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: NA-TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 8/20/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust :8/26/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.629485Original Principal Amount: $167,015.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 5 5 , 1 3 8 . 2 5

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 2, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES FILING NO. 3, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:331 Pinewood RoadFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/24/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: (303) 223-7932Attorney file #: 14-945-28062

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0010First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (37)

38 Pikes Peak Courier May 13, 2015

38

Public NoticeTELLER COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST APRIL 2015

GENERAL FUND $285,891.41ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND $33,698.29SOCIAL SERVICES FUND $51,162.55CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND $23,113.11CONSERVATION TRUST FUND $76.21WASTEWATER UTILITY FUND $16,344.48JAIL ENTERPRISE FUND $138,699.49FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND $78,553.41EMPLOYEE BENEFITS FUND $73,353.61CLERK & RECORDER’S TRUST FUND $254,247.19PAYROLL TRUST FUND $17,925.06TOTAL $973,064.81 VENDOR AMOUNT DESCRIPTION4RIVERS EQUIPMENT 25.44 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLAAA COLLECTORS 21.00 REFUNDABC LEGAL DOCS 160.00 TRAINING/TRAVELACORN PETROLEUM 11,312.99 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLACTION 22, INC 100.00 TRAINING/TRAVELAFLAC PREM HLDG 7,696.44 P/R RELATEDA-RITE PLACE STRG 52.00 GRANT EXPAT&T 62.67 SERVICESAUTO TRUCK GRP 74.33 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLAXIS BUS TECH 892.44 REP & MAINTBANCROFT, L 64.80 TRAINING/TRAVELBAUER, DAVID A PC 23.00 REFUNDBEYOND TECHNOLOGY 357.26 SUPPLIESBIG SKY AUTO 91.60 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLBLACK HILLS ENERGY 10,546.61 OCCUPANCY COSTSBLUE RIBBON TROPHIES 52.00 SUPPLIESBLUETARP FINANCIAL 2,243.20 FIRE SUPPORTBOB BARKER CO 1,312.94 SUPPLIESBRIM HEALTHCARE 647.98 SERVICESBRITE 16,011.00 PRIN/INT PMTBROWN, ET AL 31.00 REFUNDC B I 1,233.00 PROF SVCSCA PROFESSIONAL MFG 452.76 SUPPLIESCA STATE DISB UNIT 270.00 PASS-THRUCALPHO 140.00 MEMB/CERTCAMFIL FARR 417.96 REP & MAINTCARQUEST 506.18 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCASA 16,032.60 GRANT EXPCASEY, L 34.20 GRANT EXPCBM FOOD SVC 10,604.76 SERVICESCC HARDWARE & SUPPLY 107.89 SUPPLIESCCP IND, INC 196.40 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCDD 366.00 GRANT EXPCDFRC 13,320.32 GRANT EXPCDHS 240.00 C&R LIABILITIESCDLE 175.00 MEMB/CERTCDPHE 274.26 SUPPLIESCDW GOVERNMENT 1,226.40 FURN/EQUIPCENTURYLINK 1,858.12 SERVICESCGHSFOA 630.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCHAPMAN, L 94.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCHAVEZ, D 16.61 TRAIN/TRAVEL/SUPPCHEMATOX LAB INC 575.00 PROF SVCSCITY MARKET 52.31 GRANT EXPCITY MARKET 21.51 PUB/EMPL RELATNCITY OF CC 146.75 C&R LIABILITIESCITY OF CC 248.88 OCCUPANCY COSTSCITY OF WP 11,910.97 C&R LIABILITIESCITY OF WP 16,110.00 SERVICESCLASS C SOL GRP 846.74 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCLIFFORD, F 169.97 FIRE SUPPORTCNSRTIUM OLDER ADULT 2,600.00 GRANT EXPCNTY SHERIFFS OF CO 275.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCO COMPRESSED GASES 111.60 SERVICESCO CORONER’S ASSOC 1,200.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCO DEPT OF REV 241,289.85 C&R LIABILITIESCO DEPT OF REV 150.00 PASS-THRUCO NATURAL GAS 5,338.21 OCCUPANCY COSTSCO SECTY OF STATE 15.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCO STATE TREASURER 6,932.53 EMPLOYEE INSCOBITCO 744.95 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLCOLORADO COUNTIES 1,750.00 TRAINING/TRAVELCOMM MEDIA OF CO 307.00 GRANT EXPCOMM MEDIA OF CO 1,358.22 SERVICESCOMM OF CARING 330.00 GRANT EXPCOMM OF CARING 560.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSCONFIDENTIAL CLIENT 396.72 GRANT EXPCORRCTNL HLTH PRTNR 29,174.75 PROF SVCSCREAN, M 1,845.24 TRAINING/TRAVELCREATIVE CONCEPTS 682.50 GRANT EXPCRESSON ELEMENTARY 1,150.00 GRANT EXPCSSD 1,158.06 PASS-THRUCUMMINS, P & H 61.27 C&R LIABILITIESDANIEL, T 25.00 REFUNDDANIELS LONG CHEV 222.12 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLDANIELS LONG CHEV 26,422.10 EQUIPMENTDASH MEDICAL GLOVES 281.40 SUPPLIES

DAVIS, J 27.20 GRANT EXPDEEP ROCK 160.77 SUPPL/GRANT EXPDELL 1,026.35 PRIN/INT PMTDELL 1,939.83 REP & MAINTDISH NETWORK 181.85 SERVICESDIVERSIFIED COLL SVC 323.78 PASS-THRUDIVIDE COLLISION CTR 1,532.88 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLDIVIDE FIRE PROT 50.00 PUB/EMPL RELATNDIVIDE VENTURE FOODS 5.94 SUPPLIESDIVIDE WATER PROVIDE 2,348.30 OCCUPANCY COSTSDOUSSETT, A 35.00 TRAINING/TRAVELDRIVE TRAIN IND 159.18 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLDZIEN, D 170.77 GRANT EXP/TRG/TRVDZIEN, D 10.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSEBHERT, R 24.40 GRANT EXPEL PASO DA 51,436.96 GRANT EXPEL PASO DA 31,943.75 PROF SVCSELEVATOR WORLD 627.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLELLIOTT, PAM 59.85 TRAINING/TRAVELEMERGICARE MED 35.00 PROF SVCSENGINEER SUPPLY 108.24 SUPPLIESESTEVANE, C 89.20 GRANT EXPFAMILY SUPPORT REG 1,135.00 PASS-THRUFEDEX KINKO’S 134.09 SUPPLIESFILEONQ 90.00 SUPPLIESFITZGERALD, D 38.00 GRANTEXP/TRG/TVLFORWARD COMM 5,175.76 PRIN/INT PMTFOXWORTH-GALBRAITH 72.96 REP & MAINTFOXWORTH-GALBRAITH 78.13 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLFRASCONA, ET AL 12.00 REFUNDG&K SERVICES 826.44 UNIFORMGASB 225.00 SUPPLIESGCR TIRES & SVC 2,509.04 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLGEN AIR SVC & SUPPL 399.38 FURN/EQUIPGENELLE, E 21.00 REFUNDGOLD HILL SQ N 350.00 GRANT EXPGOVCONNECTION 695.34 SUPPLIESGRACE, S 95.51 GRANT EXPGRAY OIL 3,344.23 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLGREEN MTN FALLS 428.88 C&R LIABILITIESHARRIS, J 34.40 TRAINING/TRAVELHOGAN GOV 7,500.00 PROF SVCSHOTEL ELEGANTE 178.00 TRAINING/TRAVELHUMANA 80,491.39 P/R RELATEDHYATT REGNCY BAL 874.90 GRANT EXPICC 96.50 SUPPLIESIMAGES IN INK 200.00 SUPPLIESINTEGRA TELECOM 4,931.04 SERVICESINTERSTATE BATTERY 777.15 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLIREA 7,701.43 OCCUPANCY COSTSIVORY, J 4,074.85 GRANT EXPIVY COTTAGE 859.00 GRANT EXPJBUILT REPAIR 1,200.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLJET SERVICE 145.00 PROF SVCSKARTCO LLC 135.05 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLKB EMBLEM CO 165.00 SUPPLIESKELLEY BLUE BOOK 98.00 SUPPLIESKETTLER, K 98.20 GRANT EXPKEYSTONE RESORT 1,088.88 TRAINING/TRAVELKILLAM GAS BURNER CO 16,500.00 REP & MAINTKONICA MINOLTA 45.15 REP & MAINTLAWS EMRGY VEH 35.50 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLLEACHMAN, M 41.00 REFUNDLEXIS NEXIS 339.77 SUPPLIESLK GEO CHARTER SCH 482.37 GRANT EXPLONGMIRE, M 54.30 TRAINING/TRAVELMACHOL & JOHANNES 18.00 REFUNDMARK’S 847.33 REP & MAINTMAUTHE, K 166.00 TRAINING/TRAVELMCCANDLESS 759.68 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMEMORIAL HEALTH SYS 100.52 SERVICESMFCP INC 156.01 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMGA 701.75 REP & MAINTMHC KENWORTH 736.01 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMIDWEST BARRICADE 138.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLMIKESELL, JASON 70.00 TRAVELMILLER, D 140.00 TRAVELMOORHEAD, D 70.00 TRAVELMTECH 255.00 SERVICESMULTICARD 1,430.84 FIRE SUPPORTNEVE’S UNIFORMS 799.00 GRANT EXPO’CONNOR CONSULTING 5,600.00 SERVICESOFFICE DEPOT 1,580.66 SUPPLIESOFFICEMAX INC 1,455.98 SUPPL/GRANT EXPOJ WATSON CO 14,490.00 EQUIPMENTOLSON PLUMBING 814.38 REP & MAINTORACLE AMERICA 706.39 REP & MAINTO’REILLY AUTO 64.68 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLOVERHEAD DOOR 640.75 REP & MAINTPANTHER F/C 91.00 GRANT EXPPAY CENTER 1 900.00 PRIN/INT PMTPEAK INTERNET 285.00 SERVICESPERFORMANCE RADIATOR 125.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL

PERKINS MOTOR CITY 244.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLPERLMUTTER, ATTY D 48.00 REFUNDPETTY CASH 259.79 TRNG/TRVL/SERVPETTY, K & D 133.47 C&R LIABILITIESPHIL LONG FORD 1,106.59 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLPIONEER CREDIT REC 54.00 PASS-THRUPITNEY BOWES 2,600.00 SERVICESPK ENTERPRISES 3,729.29 OCCUPANCY COSTSPK ENTERPRISES 13,468.80 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLPLATTE FLORAL 60.00 PUB/EMPL RELATNPLATTEN, M 224.18 TRNG/TRVL/SERVPOLARIZED ELECTRIC 5,396.20 REP & MAINTPOSTIVE PROMOTIONS 83.90 GRANT EXPPP CREDIT UNION 50.00 PUB/EMPL RELATNPP REG BLDG DEPT 500.00 REP & MAINTPRECISION INSTRUMNTS 180.00 GRANT EXPPROFILE EAP 1,264.00 EMPLOYEE INSPROSPECT HOME CARE 18,750.00 GRANT EXPPSI SYSTEMS 710.57 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLRAD/IMAG CONSULT 35.62 SERVICESRED DOG RADIOS 1,375.60 REP & MAINTRIEGER, B 51.20 TRAINING/TRAVELRL POLK & CO 55.00 REFUNDROCKY MTN MCRFILM 4,759.50 SRV/R&M/FRN/EQIPROCKY MTN PBS 345.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSRUCKER, K 33.30 GRANT EXPSANDUCCI ELECTRIC 398.30 REP & MAINTSCHMIDT CONSTR CO 1,007.86 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLSCHUMACHERS ALIGNMNT 192.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLSKAGGS, T 135.74 TRAINING/TRAVELSLOAN, D 51.05 TRAINING/TRAVELSMITH, K 151.20 GRANT EXPSPARKS WILLSON ET AL 22,989.50 PROF SVCSSTANDARD COFFEE SVC 50.86 SUPPLIESSTAPLES 127.57 SUPPLIESSTATE OF CO 821.69 SERVICESSTERICYCLE 182.16 OCCUPANCY COSTSSTOLL, C 70.00 TRAVELSUNCOR 12,128.45 SUPPLIESTAMARAC BUS PRK 12,300.00 OCCUPANCY COSTSTAMARAC BUS PRK 600.00 SERVICESTAYCO SCREEN PRNTG 210.69 EMP WELLNESS/SUPPLTC C&R 10.98 EQUIPMENTTC JAIL 154.00 SUPPLIESTELLER SENIOR COALTN 1,125.00 COMMUNITY SVCSTELRITE CORP 163.34 SERVICESTHE LOCK SHOP 2,175.68 REP & MAINTTHE UPS STORE 61.68 SUPPLIESTKE CORP 1,925.15 SERVICESTOTAL OFFICE SOLUTNS 1,449.74 SUPPL/FURN/EQUIPTRACTOR SUPPLY CO 13.98 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLTRANSWEST TRUCKS 310.92 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLTRITECH FORENSICS 65.45 PROF SVCSTRUE, D 70.00 TRAVELUNCC 1.43 SERVICESUNITED REPROGRAPHIC 20.24 REP & MAINTUMB 4,865.86 PURCH CARD PMTUS POSTMASTER 455.00 SERVICESUSPS 60.00 SERVICESUTE PASS CONCRETE 533.71 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLVENTURE FUEL 60.00 GRANT EXPVERIZON WIRELESS 3,416.06 SERVICESVISION SVC PLAN 2,450.70 EMPLOYEE INSWAGNER EQUIP 4,911.21 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWAKEFIELD & ASSOC 21.00 REFUNDWALMART 257.40 GRANT EXPWALMART 29.91 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWALMART 155.10 SUPPL/REP&MNTWASTE MGT 1,533.99 OCCUPANCY COSTSWAXIE SANITARY SUPP 628.06 SUPPLIESWEAR PARTS & EQUIP 1,193.45 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWEBER-WETZEL, D 32.40 TRAIN/TRAVEL/CERTWELLSFARGO 82,480.00 PROF SVCSWHEELED COACH IND 139.54 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWILLIAMS, M LAW 46.00 REFUNDWILSON, D 14.00 TRAINING/TRAVELWIMACTEL, INC 280.00 SERVICESWINGFOOT COMM TIRE 1,453.44 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWOODLAND HARDWARE 168.13 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWOODLAND HARDWARE 155.61 SUPPL/REP&MNTWP NAPA 3,222.07 ROAD/SHOP SUPPLWP SCHOOL DIST RE-2 8,979.00 GRANT EXP/SERVICESXEROX 269.97 REP & MAINTYOUNG WILLIAMS PC 10,973.35 SERVICESZENTZ, S C 6,142.50 PROF SVCS

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTYCOMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72740First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0010

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 19, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): YVETTE M. DOWN-ING AND JAMES P. DOWNINGOriginal Beneficiary(ies): MORTGAGEELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-TEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOM-INEE FOR LENDER, WR STARKEYMORTGAGE, L.L.P.Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: NA-TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 8/20/2009Recording Date of Deed of Trust:8/26/2009Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.629485Original Principal Amount: $167,015.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 5 5 , 1 3 8 . 2 5

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

Failure to pay monthly installments dueNote Holder.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 2, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ES-TATES FILING NO. 3, COUNTY OFTELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

which has the address of:331 Pinewood RoadFlorissant, CO 80816

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/24/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: JOLENE KAMINSKIAttorney Registration #46144MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228Phone: (303) 274-0155Fax: (303) 223-7932Attorney file #: 14-945-28062

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0010First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0011

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 19, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): CRAIG RATZAT ANDWENDY RATZATOriginal Beneficiary(ies): VECTRA BANKCOLORADO, NACurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: NA-TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/27/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 7/5/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.582058Original Principal Amount: $172,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 4 9 , 5 5 0 . 8 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 24, SPRING VALLEY SUBDIVI-SION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OFCOLORADO.

which has the address of:1779 Spring Valley DriveDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/25/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: KELLY MURDOCKAttorney Registration #46915JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-002727

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0011First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Trustees

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0011

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 19, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): CRAIG RATZAT ANDWENDY RATZATOriginal Beneficiary(ies): VECTRA BANKCOLORADO, NACurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: NA-TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/27/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 7/5/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.582058Original Principal Amount: $172,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 4 9 , 5 5 0 . 8 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 24, SPRING VALLEY SUBDIVI-SION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OFCOLORADO.

which has the address of:1779 Spring Valley DriveDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/25/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: KELLY MURDOCKAttorney Registration #46915JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-002727

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0011First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION(CRS §38-38-103)

Foreclosure Sale No. 2015-0011

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice isgiven with regard to the following de-scribed Deed of Trust:

On February 19, 2015, the undersignedPublic Trustee caused the Notice of Elec-tion and Demand relating to the Deed ofTrust described below to be recorded inthe County of Teller records.

Original Grantor(s): CRAIG RATZAT ANDWENDY RATZATOriginal Beneficiary(ies): VECTRA BANKCOLORADO, NACurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: NA-TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLCDate of Deed of Trust: 6/27/2005Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 7/5/2005Recorded in Teller County: Reception No.582058Original Principal Amount: $172,000.00O u t s t a n d i n g P r i n c i p a l B a l a n c e :$ 1 4 9 , 5 5 0 . 8 0

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), youare hereby notified that the covenants ofthe deed of trust have been violated asfollows:

The failure to timely make payments asrequired under the Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BEA FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREINIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY EN-CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEDEED OF TRUST.

LOT 24, SPRING VALLEY SUBDIVI-SION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OFCOLORADO.

which has the address of:1779 Spring Valley DriveDivide, CO 80814

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debtsecured by the Deed of Trust describedherein, has filed Notice of Election andDemand for sale as provided by law andin said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Giventhat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon ofJune 10, 2015, at the Teller County Pub-lic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave.,Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at publicauction to the highest and best bidder forcash, the said real property and all in-terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirsand assigns therein, for the purpose ofpaying the indebtedness provided in saidEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed ofTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expensesof sale and other items allowed by law,and will issue to the purchaser a Certific-ate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TOA LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TOFILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CUREBY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TOCURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED.

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT ALENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOL-ATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ASINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBI-TION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SEC-TION 38-38-103.2. THE BORROWERMAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THECOLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL,THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINAN-CIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB),OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM-PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORE-CLOSURE PROCESS.

Colorado Attorney General1300 Broadway, 10th FloorDenver, Colorado 80203(800) 222-4444www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov

Federal Consumer FinancialProtection BureauP.O. Box 4503Iowa City, Iowa 52244(855) 411-2372www.consumerfinance.gov

First Publication: 4/15/2015Last Publication: 5/13/2015Published in: Pikes Peak Courier

Dated: 2/25/2015ROBERT W. CAMPBELLTeller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEEBy: Shirley A. KintDeputy Public Trustee

Attorney: KELLY MURDOCKAttorney Registration #46915JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C.9800 S. MERIDIAN BLVD., SUITE 400,ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 80112Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994Attorney file #: 14-002727

The Attorney above is acting as a debtcollector and is attempting to collect adebt. Any information provided may beused for that purpose.

Legal Notice No.:2015-0011First Publication: April 15, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Notice To Creditors

Public Notice

NOTICE TO CREDITORSEstate of John F. Cogan,

a.k.a. John Francis Cogan,a.k.a. John F. Cogan, Jr.,

a.k.a. John Francis Cogan, Jr.,Deceased

Case Number: 2015PR30018;Division W

All persons having claims against theabove-named estate are required topresent them to the Personal Represent-ative or to the District Court of TellerCounty, Colorado, on or before Septem-ber 14, 2015, or the claims may be foreverbarred.

Marjorie A. CoganPersonal Representative2591 Eldorado Springs Dr.Loveland, CO 80538-5321

Angela M. Kruse #18874Attorney for PersonalRepresentativeKruse & Lynch, P.C.1771 South 8th StreetColorado Springs, CO 80905(719) 473-9911

Legal Notice No.: 72753First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice

Pursuant to notice sent via certified mail tothe last known address; all contents in thefollowing unit/units will be sold for cash.The sale will be held at Gorman Auctions,2150 W Garden of the Gods Rd Suite B,Colorado Springs, CO 80907 on 6/1/2015by A-Z Self Storage, P.O. Box 315,Woodland Park, CO 80866, 719-687-6042

Name: Christine KliewerLast known address: P.O. Box 386Woodland Park CO 80866

Legal Notice No.: 72739First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 20, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals Public Notice

STATE OF COLORADOColorado Inactive MineReclamation Program

The State of Colorado, Division ofReclamation, Mining and Safety, InactiveMine Reclamation Program is preparingan environmental assessment and devel-oping projects in Teller County to addressproblems associated with Abandoned orInactive Mines. The program will safe-guard the main headframe & unstableground beneath it at the Gold King Head-frame Stabilization Project.

If you have any questions regarding thisproject contact Jeff Graves, at the Divi-sion of Reclamation, Mining and Safety,1313 Sherman Street, Room 215, Denver,CO, 81203, (303) 866-3567 X8122, byMay 22, 2015.

The Colorado Inactive Mine ReclamationProgram mitigates hazards and environ-mental problems associated with pastmining activities. The program is fundedby Federal grant money made available tothe State of Colorado through the U.S.Department of Interior, Office of SurfaceMining Reclamation and Enforcement.Projects must meet eligibility require-ments as outlined in the Surface MiningControl and Reclamation Act of 1977 --Public Law 95-87.

Legal Notice No.: 72741First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

STATE OF COLORADOColorado Inactive MineReclamation Program

The State of Colorado, Division ofReclamation, Mining and Safety, InactiveMine Reclamation Program is preparingan environmental assessment and devel-oping projects in Teller County to addressproblems associated with Abandoned orInactive Mines. The program will safe-guard the main headframe & unstableground beneath it at the Gold King Head-frame Stabilization Project.

If you have any questions regarding thisproject contact Jeff Graves, at the Divi-sion of Reclamation, Mining and Safety,1313 Sherman Street, Room 215, Denver,CO, 81203, (303) 866-3567 X8122, byMay 22, 2015.

The Colorado Inactive Mine ReclamationProgram mitigates hazards and environ-mental problems associated with pastmining activities. The program is fundedby Federal grant money made available tothe State of Colorado through the U.S.Department of Interior, Office of SurfaceMining Reclamation and Enforcement.Projects must meet eligibility require-ments as outlined in the Surface MiningControl and Reclamation Act of 1977 --Public Law 95-87.

Legal Notice No.: 72741First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

STATE OF COLORADOColorado Inactive MineReclamation Program

The State of Colorado, Division ofReclamation, Mining and Safety, InactiveMine Reclamation Program is preparingan environmental assessment and devel-oping projects in Teller County to addressproblems associated with Abandoned orInactive Mines. The program will safe-guard approx. 10 hazardous mine open-ings at the Rainbow Falls Project.

If you have any questions regarding thisproject contact Jeff Graves, at the Divi-sion of Reclamation, Mining and Safety,1313 Sherman Street, Room 215, Denver,CO, 81203, (303) 866-3567 X8122, byMay 22, 2015.

The Colorado Inactive Mine ReclamationProgram mitigates hazards and environ-mental problems associated with pastmining activities. The program is fundedby Federal grant money made available tothe State of Colorado through the U.S.Department of Interior, Office of SurfaceMining Reclamation and Enforcement.Projects must meet eligibility require-ments as outlined in the Surface MiningControl and Reclamation Act of 1977 --Public Law 95-87.

Legal Notice No.: 72742First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF WOODLAND PARKCOUNCIL CHAMBERS

220 W. SOUTH AVENUE,WOODLAND PARK, CO

The City of Woodland Park Council willconsider an ordinance for 1st Reading onMay 21, 2015 and 2nd Reading/PublicHearing on June 4, 2015 both at 7:00p.m. for:

VAC15-003: A request by John RobertGatlin (Property Owner) to vacate thecommon lot line and associated 10-footutility and drainage easem*nt (5 feet oneach side) between Lots 1 and 2 ofGreen’s Addition Filing No. 2 in the UrbanResidential (UR) zone district (311 and317 E. Bowman Avenue, Woodland Park,CO).

For more information, contact the CityPlanner at 719-687-5209.

Legal Notice No.: 72743First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF WOODLAND PARKCOUNCIL CHAMBERS

220 W. SOUTH AVENUE,WOODLAND PARK, CO

The City of Woodland Park Council willconsider an ordinance for 1st Reading onMay 21, 2015 and 2nd Reading/PublicHearing on June 4, 2015 both at 7:00p.m. for:

VAC15-003: A request by John RobertGatlin (Property Owner) to vacate thecommon lot line and associated 10-footutility and drainage easem*nt (5 feet oneach side) between Lots 1 and 2 ofGreen’s Addition Filing No. 2 in the UrbanResidential (UR) zone district (311 and317 E. Bowman Avenue, Woodland Park,CO).

For more information, contact the CityPlanner at 719-687-5209.

Legal Notice No.: 72743First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20090191

The said premises were for the year A.D.2008, assessed and taxed in the name ofMICHAEL W & LISA N DORIS and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of MICHAEL W & LISAN DORIS.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

MICHAEL W & LISA N DORIS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 6th day ofNovember A.D. 2009, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2008, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L1659 COLO MTN EST 8

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto PATRICIA A & GEORGE M SABADOS,the present holders and legal ownersthereof, who hath made request upon theTreasurer of Teller County for a deed, andthat unless the same be redeemed on orbefore September 23, 2015, the saidCounty Treasurer will issue a Treasurer’sdeed therefore to said certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 6th day of May, A.D. 2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72744First date of Publication:May 13, 2015Second date of Publication:May 20, 2015Third and last date of Publication:May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20100139

The said premises were for the year A.D.2009, assessed and taxed in the name ofALVIN L & JEAN M BROWNING and theproperties are currently assessed andtaxed in the name of VERNARD D &DEBORAH SIMMONS.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

VERNARD D & DEBORAH SIMMONSENT FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONARK-LA-TEX FINANCIAL SERVICES,LLC

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 5th day ofNovember A.D. 2010, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2009, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

L30 B37 GOLDFIELD, ADJ ½ VAC ALLEY

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto WENDY BARTLETT, the present hold-er and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before Septem-ber 23, 2015, the said County Treasurerwill issue a Treasurer’s deed therefore tosaid certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 6th day of May, A.D. 2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72745First date of Publication:May 13, 2015Second date of Publication:May 20, 2015Third and last date of Publication:May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGBOARD OF TRUSTEES TOWN OF

GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, CO

Notice is hereby given that on June 2,2015 at 7:00PM the Board of Trustees ofthe Town of Green Mountain Falls willhold a Public Hearing at Town Hall, 10615Green Mountain Falls Road, Green Moun-tain Falls, Colorado, for the purpose of ad-opting an ordinance amending Section 7-104 of the Green Mountain Falls Municip-al Code, regarding Animals Prohibitedwithin the Town. Any person may appearat the Public Hearing and be heard re-garding the adoption of the proposed or-dinance.

Legal Notice No.: 72747First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20110192

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofHAROLD F ENRIGHT and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of HAROLD F ENRIGHT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

HAROLD F ENRIGHTC/O JOHN ENRIGHT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

11-15-70 11406 BERTIE C MS

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto SHILOH PLAIN INC, the present hold-er and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before Septem-ber 23, 2015, the said County Treasurerwill issue a Treasurer’s deed therefore tosaid certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 6th day of May, A.D. 2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72746First date of Publication:May 13, 2015Second date of Publication:May 20, 2015Third and last date of Publication:May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REALESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF

APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’SDEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF

PURCHASE NO. 20110192

The said premises were for the year A.D.2010, assessed and taxed in the name ofHAROLD F ENRIGHT and the propertiesare currently assessed and taxed in thename of HAROLD F ENRIGHT.

To whom it may concern and to every per-son in actual possession or occupancy ofthe hereinafter described land, lots orpremises, and to the person in whosename the same was taxed, and to all per-sons having an interest or title of record inor to the same, and particularly to:

HAROLD F ENRIGHTC/O JOHN ENRIGHT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a taxlien sale lawfully held on the 4th day ofNovember A.D. 2011, the then CountyTreasurer of Teller County, State of Color-ado, duly offered for delinquent taxes forthe year 2010, the following describedproperty, situated in County of Teller andState of Colorado, to-wit:

11-15-70 11406 BERTIE C MS

That, at said sale, said property wasstricken off to and a tax lien sale certific-ate of purchase was duly issued thereforeto SHILOH PLAIN INC, the present hold-er and legal owner thereof, who hathmade request upon the Treasurer of Tell-er County for a deed, and that unless thesame be redeemed on or before Septem-ber 23, 2015, the said County Treasurerwill issue a Treasurer’s deed therefore tosaid certificate holder.

Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County,Colorado, this 6th day of May, A.D. 2015.

ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURERTELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

Legal Notice No.: 72746First date of Publication:May 13, 2015Second date of Publication:May 20, 2015Third and last date of Publication:May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGBOARD OF TRUSTEES TOWN OF

GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, CO

Notice is hereby given that on June 2,2015 at 7:00PM the Board of Trustees ofthe Town of Green Mountain Falls willhold a Public Hearing at Town Hall, 10615Green Mountain Falls Road, Green Moun-tain Falls, Colorado, for the purpose ofrezoning properties located at 10778 &10780 Ute Pass Ace from R-1 zoning,single family residential district to a R-2,two-family residential district. Any per-son may appear at the Public Hearing andbe heard regarding the adoption of theproposed ordinance.

Legal Notice No.: 72748First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF BEER AND WINELIQUOR LICENSEPUBLIC HEARING

Pursuant to the laws of the State of Color-ado and the rules and regulations of theCity of Woodland Park, notice is herebygiven that Starbucks, 19590 E US High-way 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 hasrequested the City Council, being the loc-al licensing authority of Woodland Park, togrant a Beer and Wine Liquor License forStarbucks, located at 19590 E US High-way 24.

Public Hearing on this application willbe held before the City Council ofWoodland Park a t 7 :00 PM onThursday, May 21, 2015 in CouncilChambers, City Hall, 220 West SouthAvenue, Woodland Park.

At said time and place, any interested per-son may appear to be heard for or againstthe granting of said license.

All petitions, remonstrances or state-ments shall be filed in writing with the CityClerk at least ten (10) days prior to thedate of hearing.

Date of application: April 14, 2015

Suzanne Leclercq, City ClerkCity of Woodland Park

Legal Notice No.: 72749First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

ORDINANCE NO. 1240,SERIES 2015

AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THEUSE BY THE CITY OF WOODLANDPARK, COLORADO, OF LEASE-PUR-CHASE FINANCING FOR THE PUR-POSE OF REFUNDING THE CITY’SOUTSTANDING SERIES 1999 CERTI-FICATES OF PARTICIPATION, ASWELL AS FUNDING IMPROVEMENTSTO MEMORIAL PARK PURSUANT TOTHE TERMS OF ONE OR MORELEASE-PURCHASE AGREEMENTS BYAND BETWEEN THE WOODLANDPARK MUNICIPAL BUILDING CORPOR-ATION, AS LESSOR, AND THE CITY,AS LESSEE; AUTHORIZING OFFI-CIALS OF THE CITY TO TAKE ALL AC-TION NECESSARY TO CARRY OUTTHE TRANSACTIONS CONTEM-PLATED HEREBY; AND RELATEDMATTERS.

SUMMARY: This ordinance authorizes theuse of lease-purchase financing for thepurpose of refunding the City’s outstand-ing 1999 COPs, as well as funding im-provements to Memorial Park.

PENALTY: None.

This Ordinance was passed on secondand final reading on May 7, 2015 after no-tice and public hearing and is hereby pub-lished by title only as required by CharterSection 7.6 to be effective seven daysafter this publication.

Jessica Memmer, Deputy City ClerkCity of Woodland Park

Legal Notice No.: 72751First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 13, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Public Notice

CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEKPUBLIC HEARING

FOR CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT

AMERICAN GAMING GROUP, dba: WildWood Casino, owner, is initiating a re-quest for a Conditional Use Permit in theBB Neighborhood Mix Zone to allow aGas Station Convenience Store, (a com-mercial automobile service) to be locatedat (L5-7 E-122 FT L8 E120 FT L9 L29-33B29 CR CK HAYDEN PL), a vacant lotEast of the Wild Wood Casino.

Planning Commission Hearing on June03, 2015 at 5:30PM will be held in theCity Hall Council Chambers at 337 E.Bennett Ave. Cripple Creek, CO 80813

Planning Department requests the CityCouncil also consider the request for aConditional Use Permit on June 03, 2015at 5:30. This meeting, also to be held atCity Hall, 337 E. Bennett Ave., CrippleCreek, CO.

Comments in support or opposition to therequest should be sent to City of CrippleCreek, Planning Department PO Box 430,Cripple Creek, CO, 80813, or commentscan be made at the hearings.

Call or come to City Hall for moreinformation, 719-689-3905.

Legal Notice No.: 72752First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

Government Legals

“Trust Us!”

Noticesaremeant tobenoticed.Readyourpublicnoticesandget involved!

Without public notices,the government wouldn’thave to say anything else.Public notices are a community’s windowinto the government. From zoningregulations to local budgets, governmentshave used local newspapers to informcitizens of its actions as an essential partof your right to know.You knowwhere tolook, when to look and what to look for tobe involved as a citizen. Local newspapersprovide you with the information youneed to get involved.

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Pikes Peak Courier 39 May 13, 2015

39

OF GAMESGALLERYc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u

& w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

GALLERY OF GAMESc r o s s w o r d • s u d o k u & w e e k l y h o r o s c o p e

SALOME’S STARSFOR RELEASE WEEK OF MAY 11, 2015

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A seemingly stalled romantic situation could benefit from your reassurance that you want this relationship to work. And if you do, use a tad more of that irresistible Aries charm.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Going to new places and meeting new people appeals to both the Taurean’s romantic and practical sides. After all, you never can tell where those new contacts can take you. Right?

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) That career-change op-portunity that didn’t work out when you first considered it could come up again. But this time, remember that you have more to offer and should act accordingly.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) There could be some tensions in relationships -- domestic or workaday. But a calm approach that doesn’t raise the anger levels and a frank discussion soon will resolve the problem.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) It’s a good idea to begin preparing for that career change you’ve been thinking about for a while. Start to sharpen your skills and expand your background to be ready when it calls.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Bless that Virgo skepticism that has kept you from falling into traps oth-ers seem to rush into. But you might want to give a new possibility the benefit of the doubt, at least on a trial basis.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Travel and ca-reer are strong in your aspect. Perhaps your job will take you to someplace exotic. Or you might be setting up meetings with potential clients or employers. Whatever it is, good luck.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Someone might use deception to try to push you into making a decision you’re not fully comfortable with. But those keen Scorpio senses should keep you alert to any such attempt.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Romance dominates this week when Cupid spears the Archer, for a change. Positive things also are happening in the workplace. Expect important news to arrive by the week’s end.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Anyone trying to bully the Sea Goat -- whether it involves a personal or a professional matter -- will learn a painful lesson. Others also will benefit from the Goat’s strong example.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Congratula-tions. With things going the way they are, you should be able to spare some time and take a break from your hectic schedule for some well-earned fun and games.

PISCES (February 19 to March 21) Your sharp Pis-cean intuition should be able to uncover the true agen-das of those who might be trying to catch the Fish in one of their schemes.

BORN THIS WEEK: Your flair for innovative art and design keeps you at least a step ahead of most ev-eryone else.

© 2015 King Features Synd., Inc.

Government Legals Public Notice

CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEKPUBLIC HEARING

FOR CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT

AMERICAN GAMING GROUP, dba: WildWood Casino, owner, is initiating a re-quest for a Conditional Use Permit in theBB Neighborhood Mix Zone to allow aGas Station Convenience Store, (a com-mercial automobile service) to be locatedat (L5-7 E-122 FT L8 E120 FT L9 L29-33B29 CR CK HAYDEN PL), a vacant lotEast of the Wild Wood Casino.

Planning Commission Hearing on June03, 2015 at 5:30PM will be held in theCity Hall Council Chambers at 337 E.Bennett Ave. Cripple Creek, CO 80813

Planning Department requests the CityCouncil also consider the request for aConditional Use Permit on June 03, 2015at 5:30. This meeting, also to be held atCity Hall, 337 E. Bennett Ave., CrippleCreek, CO.

Comments in support or opposition to therequest should be sent to City of CrippleCreek, Planning Department PO Box 430,Cripple Creek, CO, 80813, or commentscan be made at the hearings.

Call or come to City Hall for moreinformation, 719-689-3905.

Legal Notice No.: 72752First Publication: May 13, 2015Last Publication: May 27, 2015Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier

KnowledgeCommunity= About Your

PublicNoticesRead the Notices! Be Informed!

ARRESTS

TELLER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

APRIL 24

Stacy Ann Dosch, date of birth March 5, 1982 of Floris-sant, was arrested for domes-tic violence and harassment. Bond set at $2,000.

APRIL 26

David Michael Whitman, date of birth May 9, 1993 of Cripple Creek, was arrested for violation of a restraining order and harassment. Bond set at $500.

Cody Allen Hall, date of birth March 31, 1991 of Victor, was arrested for violation of a protection order, speeding and careless driving. Bond set at $1,000.

APRIL 27

Joseph Michael Camp, date of birth Aug. 3, 1963 of Florissant, was arrested

for violation of a protec-tion order, harassment and domestic violence. Bond set at $3,000.

APRIL 28

Mark L. Lingofelt, date of birth Aug. 6, 1962 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for driv-ing under the influence and driving with excessive alcohol content. Bond set at $1,000.

APRIL 29

Ryan Maurer, date of birth June 30, 1984 of Colorado Springs, was arrested for driving under the influence, driving with excessive alcohol content, speeding and failure to maintain a single lane (weaving). Bond set at $1,000.

Jaimee Marie Rozell, date of birth March 3, 1983 of Col-orado Springs, was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear on an original charge of theft. Bond set at $200.

EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update a club listing, e-mail [emailprotected].

PoliticalTELLER COUNTY Democratic Party (TellerDems)invites interested persons to attend its 2015 informational and educational programs, as well as community events. For details about the TellerDems cal-endar of activities, call Mrs. Ellen Haase, 719-687-1813.

TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Comyomunity Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.teller-gop.org.

TRANSPORTATION’S LOCAL Coordi-nating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend.

ProfessionalDIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times.

COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library o�ers computer basics, Internet basics,

Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register.

PIKES PEAK Workforce Center o�ers monthly classes on topics such as resume writing, interview skills and more. Workshops are free and take place at the main o�ce, 1675 Garden of the Gods Road, Suite 1107, Colorado Springs. Call 719-667-3730 or go to www.ppwfc.org.

TELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through cooperative marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to [emailprotected] or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008

TELLER NETWORKING Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274.

RecreationART CLASSES are o�ered year-round at Shanika Studio for ages 13 and older. Classes focus on traditional oil painting skills, but also include other artistic mediums

including drawing, watercolor, acrylic and mixed media. Classes are two and a half hours and are o�ered Mondays, Thursdays or Saturdays. Days may change to meet students’ needs. Classes are taught by professional artist Kenneth Shanika. Contact 303-647-1085, [emailprotected] or www.ShanikaFineArts.com.

BEERRUN AND Ride meets Mondays for exercise and to socialize. Group goes from 4:30 p.m. until dark at Ute Bar & Grill in Woodland Park. 5K and 10K run, walk or ride.

CHRISTIAN YOGA is o�ered at 5 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sundays at Corner Street, 500 E. Midland Ave. in Woodland Park. Mindfullness-centered practice aimed at relaxation, focus, gentle movement.Contact Chrissy Bensen, with bStill Integrative Wellness LLC at 719-510-2743 (www.bStillyoga.com) before attending for the �rst time to reserve a spot; after that, just drop in. Cost is $7 per class.

FLORISSANT GRANGE Hall is available for events including weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and memorials. The Florissant Grange Hall, also known as the Old School House in Florissant, is a historic building built in 1887 and 1888. School started in the school in 1889 and continued through 1960, which creates an interesting historic atmosphere. The Old School House sits on 2-plus acres and weather permitting the grounds can be used as well. Call 719-748-5004 and leave a message to arrange a time to visit the Grange Hall and reserve this space for your event.

AREA CLUBS

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Your Business and Community Connection www.woodlandparkchamber.com

Chamber Today

to our members who renewed their investment in April!

Thanks Thanks

4 Mile Auto RepairAbsolute Septic

Active Life Chiropractic & AcupunctureBristlecone LodgeC.W.’s Plumbing

Coldwell Banker 1st Choice Realty CorporateDriver Safety Consultants

Edgewood InnEl Tesoro do los Angeles Retreat Center

Habitat for HumanityLes Heinemann Insurance Agency

Marilyn Dougall, LCSWMountain Artists

Mountain View United Methodist ChurchNew Beginnings (Fuller Center Project)

Pikes Peak InsuranceRe/Max Performance - Duncan

ServPro of North Central Colo.SpringsSheena Harper Photography

Studio West AVEDA Salon & SpaTeller Senior Coalition

Ute Country NewsWestar Masonry

Woodland Park Community Church

Your Business and Community Connection www.woodlandparkchamber.com [emailprotected] 719.687.9885 May 2015

Chamber TodayW e l c o m e N e W c h a m b e r m e m b e r s

Star Striping Service

972.962.4168

Parking LotMaintenance

andMarking

Rex Anne Nutt, Owner

Thunder Butte Mountain Lodge

943 Painted Rocks Rd303.647.2352Dreams Come True in This

Majest ic Lodge Fit for Royalty..Weddings & Large Events

The lodge currently wi l l s leep up to 22 guests and is surrounded by pine, with amazing views in

al l direct ions. www.vrbo.com/570477

Jim & Deb Bruner, Managers

Creekside Payroll & Business Services

719.213.6617I provide accurate and timely payroll

services that cater to the small to mid-sized businesses in our community. Services offered include: Payroll

Processing, Direct Deposit Transactions, Federal & State Tax Withholding, Quarterly Tax Filing,

Processing of Annual W-2 & 1099 Forms.

creeksidepayrol l@gmail .comCarrie Elwell, Owner

Join the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

TODAY!

719.687.9885

Your business could be featured here.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

Debbie Miller, IOM, ACEPresident

Sue Griswold, IOMMembership

TexCo Translation Service

719.687.0911

In this global economy, accurate communication is key to the

growth and success of business. Cert i f ied as a professional enti ty,

TexCo Translat ion Service is dedicated to your translat ion

requirements and wil l fai thful ly transfer your message meaning from one language to the other.

www.texcotransserv.com David Griff in, Owner

Wild Wings ‘N Things

1079 E. Highway 24719.686.9464

Under New Ownership!Wild Wings N’ Things serves

Tradit ional and Boneless Wings in over a dozen different f lavors.

We also serve sandwiches and salads.

www.facebook.com/wildwings.woodlandpark.154

Paul Lavigne, Owner

May 14: Ribbon Cutting Little Chapel Food Pantry 3:00 p.m. Ute Pass Cultural Center

May 19: Business After Hours Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center 5:30 - 7:00 p.m.

May 23 - Visitor Center Summer HoursSept. 7 Mon. - Fri.: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Sat. & Sun.: 10:00 am - 2:00 pm

Jun. 4: Lunch and Learn “Business and Personal Firearm Defense - Your rights, liabilities and preparation options” presented by Paul Sabourin, Concealed Honor 11:30 - 1:00 p.m. Member Price $15 RSVP: woodlandparkchamber.com

Jun. 9: Partner Benefits 101 Class 10:00 a.m. Ute Pass Cultural Center RSVP: woodlandparkchamber.com

Calendar of EventsCalendar of EventsGreater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

The Chamber hosted a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for Park State Bank & Trust. They are celebrating 50 years in Business! Congratulations!

A Ribbon Cutting for Wild Wings ‘N Things was held to welcome new owner, Paul Lavigne. They are located at 1079 E. Hwy. 24, Woodland Park and may be reached at 719.686.9464.

Teller County Regional Animal Shelter Ribbon Cutting was held at their location 308 Weaverville Road, Divide. Contact them at 719.686.7707

Our Annual “FAM” tour where we visited ten local area attractions. Pictured above at Mueller State Park.

Customer Service! SMILE even if you are on the phone, your customer will know if you are really happy to see them or talk to them. Engage them in conversation. Let them know how delighted you are they are shopping, dining or staying at your facility.

Spruce Up or Touch Up your entrance! When is the last time you walked through your front entrance? Does it make the statement you want? This applies to ALL Woodland Park and Teller County Businesses!

Information Sharing is a must. If you are unsure about a product, service or hours for our local and county businesses call us at 719.687.9885. We are open M-F ~ 8 am - 5 pm and on Weekends from 10 am - 2 pm. We will do our best to assist everyone!

Enjoy! Enjoy the tourists, the traffic delays, the warm long summer days, and enjoy the good fortune we have to share our region with others. You might just meet that visitor again, only this time as your neighbor!

Woodland Designs held a Chamber sponsored Ribbon Cutting recently. They are located at 108 E. Midland Ave., lower level, Woodland Park. Contact them at 719.686.5615

Tourist Season Is Here! A message from Chamber President Debbie Miller

Pikes Peak Courier 0513 - [PDF Document] (2024)

FAQs

What is the newspaper in Woodland Park Colorado? ›

The Pikes Peak Courier serves readers in Woodland Park, Cripple Creek, Victor and Teller County, the best and most up-to-date local news Colorado has to offer. The Tribune provides news from the Black Forest, Monument, Palmer Lake and Woodmoor areas of Northern El Paso County.

How high is Pikes Peak? ›

Pikes Peak - America's Mountain offers a variety of activities, wildlife and spectacular views. There are health concerns and weather concerns associated with the ascent to 14,115 feet in elevation.

What is the largest newspaper in Colorado? ›

The Denver Post – Colorado breaking news, sports, business, weather, entertainment.

What is the oldest newspaper in Denver? ›

The Rocky Mountain News, a newspaper that was a Denver institution for just short of 150 years, was Colorado's oldest newspaper and possibly the longest-running business in the state.

Where is the Colorado Sun newspaper? ›

Denver, CO

What is the major Denver newspaper? ›

The Denver Post is the city's primary newspaper, published daily.

What is the local newspaper called in Colorado Springs? ›

Colorado Springs Gazette - CSPM.

Is the Denver Post a real newspaper? ›

The Denver Post is a daily newspaper and website published in the Denver metropolitan area. As of June 2022, it has an average print circulation of 57,265.

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